Prairie Song and Western Story

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Kessinger Publishing, Apr 1, 2005 - Fiction - 400 pages
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1928. Hamlin Garland was born near La Crosse, Wisconsin and lived in the area for nine years before his family moved to South Dakota. As an adult he lived in major cities throughout the United States but visited his birthplace often. In 1922 he received a Pulitzer Prize for A Daughter of the Middle Border, and was also director of the American Academy of Arts and Letters for a number of years. The choice of material for Prairie Song and Western Story was made in cooperation with the author. The selections are drawn from the pages of his novels, short stories, and essays, in which he has portrayed the march of settlement in the Middle West. In this text are the romance and the grim reality of the lives of the pioneers who pushed our frontier westward beyond the last mountain barriers and on to the Pacific slope. The fortunes of the Garland and McClintock families parallel vividly the drama of our westward-moving Middle Border. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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About the author (2005)

Hamlin Garland was born and raised on pioneer farms in the upper Midwest, and his earliest and best fiction (most of it collected in Main Travelled Roads, 1891) deals with the unremitting hardship of frontier life---angry, realistic stories about the toil and abuses to which farmers of the time were subjected. As his fiction became more popular and romantic, its quality seriously declined, and Garland is remembered today chiefly for a handful of stories, such as "Under the Lion's Paw" and "Rose of Dutcher's Coolly." His only contribution to literary theory is Crumbling Idols (1894), in which he argued for an art that was truthful, humanitarian, and rooted in a specific locale. The first volume of his autobiography, A Son of the Middle Border (1917), was followed by the much-admired second volume, A Daughter of the Middle Border (1921), which was awarded a Pulitzer Prize. He published several other volumes of reminiscence, all of which are once more available with the reprinting of the 45-volume collection of his works.

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