Prairie Experiences in Handling Cattle and Sheep

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O. Judd Company, 1885 - Frontier and pioneer life - 215 pages
 

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Page 25 - Formerly the man who shouted loudest, galloped hardest, and was quickest in drawing his "gun/' was considered the most dashing cow-boy; if he had come up on the Texas trail, and had failed to kill his man, he was held to have wasted his opportunities. But times are changing; it is only in the South — for instance, Arizona — where the term cowboy is equivalent to desperado. CHAPTER THIRD.
Page 110 - There is naught hut dust, under which sheep for a time will continue to find scraps and pickings, though not a blade is observable to the eye; this of course does not last long. To buy sheep in such a season is a mere lottery; rain may fall, when your transaction turns up trumps; rain may hold off, when your sheep, unless singularly well managed, will weaken, and, once they begin dying, depart by hundreds.
Page 48 - ... This little trip in the dark is not one to enjoy. There may be twenty cars, say forty feet long each. Before you have crossed two or three the train is going at full speed. Only one man has a lantern ; you are incommoded by a heavy great-coat, as the air at night is keen ; the step from...
Page 130 - Both of these havt to be applied with hot water, which is a great additional trouble, as the appliances at most dipping-stations are of the rudest. A weak solution of carbolic acid and a patent Australian chemical are also used for dipping; these can be mixed in cold water. Some men put their sheep through the natural hot mineral waters which abound in the West. Each farmer will swear by his own particular spring. It cures the scab in sheep, removes corns and rheumatism in men. and is efficacious...
Page 126 - ... landholders, most of whom are owners of sheep which have to be traveled twice a year, will not object. As a rule the large owners do not trouble traveling bands much; but a small man, whose land borders the road, mounts his horse on the first sight of the column of dust which announces the approach of a band of sheep and rides to meet it. He is all on the fight; first he wants you to go back, then to go round, and last to manage the herd as you might a battalion of soldiers, and march them past...
Page 48 - ... their charges, makes the trip a disagreeable one. The night is no time for sleep. At each halt you must jump out, one man with a lantern, both with goads, walk along the rough ballast, and peer into each car to discover a cow which requires stirring up. Having found an offender you poke her, prod her, twist her tail, and do your utmost to make her rise. In the middle of your efforts the bell rings, the train starts; you clamber up the side of the car onto the roof, and when there make the best...
Page 178 - The food out in camp is simple and coarse. Nothing but the wonderfully pure air and hard exercise would make it palatable to or digestible by the ordinary mortal. There is, however, no choice — rich or poor, master or man, all sit down to the same provisions, fare alike, and, I may add, enjoy theii food. The stock for camp consists of flour, baking powder, necessary but more or less deleterious, coffee, tea, sugar and bacon. With a wagon we can afford to carry tins of tomato, green corn and fruit,...
Page 131 - ... that some day its virtues will be apparent to an Eastern capitalist with money to develop it, and to create an establishment like the White Surphur Springs, with a vista of shares, purchase-money and a snug monopoly tor the rest of his days. About twelve o'clock the sheep penned in the morning are through; the men knock off for dinner. Although there are three reliefs in plunging the sheep into the dip, it has been hard work. The sun is very bright and hot, the air is close inside the shed. The...
Page 140 - ... a line, gives a notion of their aboriginal and miserable style of living. The picture will be completed by Supposing an ancient and wrinkled hag sitting on a flat rock in the ground pounding the pine-nuts into flour, the mortar being a hole in the 'rock itself. For a few marches out there are corrals, in which the sheep can be placed at night, and out of which they can be counted in the morning. This, however, takes so long a time that, as a rule, it is done only every second or third day; counting...
Page 35 - The biggest are by no means the best; a short, compact pony of about fourteen hands works quickly than a larger animal. Some of them, with small, well-shaped heads and bright eyes, are very taking-looking animals; their manes and coats are shaggy, showing coarse breeding, and their tempers not to be trusted. Each boy, when out cow-punching, rides from six to ten horses, using them in turns, and without the slightest compunction riding one horse fifty or sixty miles, of which a good deal may be fast...

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