Prayers in Public Schools and Other Matters: Hearings Before the Committee on the Judiciary, Eighty-seventh Congress, Second Session, on S.J. Res. 205 [and Others], July 26 and August 2, 1962, Volume 4, Page 89

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Considers (87) S.J. Res. 205, (87) S.J. Res. 206, (87) S.J. Res. 207, (87) S. Con. Res. 81, (87) S. Res. 356.
 

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Page 278 - That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences...
Page 258 - establishment of religion' clause of the First Amendment means at least this : Neither a state nor the Federal Government can set up a church. Neither can pass laws which aid one religion, aid all religions or prefer one religion over another.
Page 277 - The free exercise and enjoyment of religious profession and worship, without discrimination or preference, shall forever be allowed in this state to all mankind ; and no person shall be rendered incompetent to be a witness on account of his opinions on matters of religious belief; but the liberty of conscience hereby secured shall not be so construed as to excuse acts of licentiousness, or justify practices inconsistent with the peace or safety of this state.
Page 267 - All men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences; no man can of right be compelled to attend, erect or support any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry against his consent...
Page 281 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 151 - Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.
Page 107 - ... it is no part of the business of government to compose official prayers for. any group of the American people to recite as a part of a religious program carried on by government.
Page 199 - The First Amendment, however, does not say that in every and all respects there shall be a separation of Church and State. Rather, it studiously defines the manner, the specific ways, in which there shall be no concert or union or dependency one on the other. That is the common sense of the matter.
Page 113 - Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity, in exclusion of all other religions, may establish with the same ease any particular sect of Christians, in exclusion of all other sects? that the same authority which can force a citizen to contribute three pence only of his property for the support of any one establishment, may force him to conform to any other establishment in all cases whatsoever?
Page 278 - Incompetent to be a witness or juror on account of his opinions on matters of religious belief; but the liberty of conscience hereby secured shall not be so construed as to excuse acts of- licentiousness, or justify practices inconsistent with the peace or safety of this State.

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