The atonement. Widdlezig. A fragment of modern history. A stir in the household. Civil war

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H. Colburn, 1840
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Page 274 - Bland; on the left, three other squadrons, commanded by Lord Ancrum. The second line consisted of five battalions, placed to face the openings of the front line, with three pieces of cannon placed between the first and second battalions on the right and left of the same line : in order that if the enemy either broke through the centre, or outflanked either the right or left of the front, they might conveniently play upon them. To support both, and as a final reserve, were placed the remaining four...
Page 271 - The arrival of his Royal Highness the Duke has done the business, animated our army, and struck the rebels with terror and confusion. He lost no time to improve these advantages, marched the whole army yesterday to Linlithgow and the adjacent places, and continued his march this morning to Falkirk ; the rebels always flying before him. This morning the rebels renewed their...
Page 269 - I hoped that the rebels, flushed with their late success, would have given us an opportunity of finishing the affair at once; which, I am morally sure, would have been in our favour, as the troops in general shewed all the spirit that I could wish, and would have retrieved whatever slips were past. But, to my great astonishment, they had blown up their powder magazines, and were retired over the Forth at Frew, leaving their cannon behind them, and a number of their sick and wounded, besides twenty...
Page 270 - But, to my great astonishment, they had blown up their powder magazines, and were retired over the Forth at Frew, leaving their cannon behind them, and a number of their sick and wounded, besides twenty of our wounded prisoners taken at the late affair, which I have found here. I hope to be at Stirling to-morrow, from whence I shall be better able to inform you of all this strange flight. " Brigadier Mordaunt with the two regiments of dragoons, and Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell with the Highlanders,...
Page 223 - Providence had given the country an admirable law for the maintenance of the poor ; under the provisions of which, besides wholesome and regular diet, they were relieved from the worry of ever seeing or being pestered by their relations or friends, and, by the salutary regulations of their respective residences, relieved from the trouble of taking any unnecessary exercise. With regard to their servants, it is impossible to convey an adequate idea of the manner in which they treated them ; believing,...
Page 269 - ... and to the corresponding dread and panic of the rebels, is afforded in two letters, of which, although historical records are perhaps imperfectly remembered in days when greater deeds and more astounding victories have almost obliterated the recollection of Blenheim, Malplaquet, and Oudenard, seem to justify their insertion here. One of these letters is addressed by his Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland to the Duke of Newcastle, dated from Falkirk ; the other to the same nobleman, by the...
Page 266 - It is all part of the same system — thanks to George Brown my eyes are opened. My own selfishness and waywardness have caused all the manoeuvring and deception in my household, of which I have complained. — I'll start fresh — take a new course — burn my steel traps — tie up the dogs — pull down my defiance to beggars, and, for the future, continue to recollect that there really is somebody else in the world besides Mr. Singleton Munns.
Page 233 - I tell you what, sir," said Munns, "my comfort is not to be disturbed by your noise : — if ever you tumble down stairs again, and hurt yourself in this way, I'll have you horsewhipped — so get along, and no more crying." This threat may seem outre and unnatural ; but a fact is recorded as true, which fully justifies it. During the rebuilding of the church of St. Paul, Covent Garden, after its destruction, by fire, on the 17th of September, 1795, a bricklayer's labourer was working on the scaffold,...
Page 227 - ' it is all very well for you, ma'am, who think of nobody but yourself, to keep this sick man and his children about the premises, I don't like pulmonary complaints so near me — I have heard they are catching." " So have I," said the lady, " but I take care never to go near them." "They must go, Mrs. Munns,

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