Preliminary Catalogue of the Elbridge G. Hall Collection of Casts of Sculpture

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1891 - Sculpture - 137 pages
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Page 45 - Only a sculptor of the finest imagination, the most delicate taste, the sweetest feeling, and the rarest artistic skill — in a word, a sculptor and a poet too — could have first dreamed of a Faun in this guise, and then have succeeded in imprisoning the sportive and frisky thing in marble. Neither man nor animal, and yet no monster; but a being in whom both races meet on friendly ground.
Page 57 - ... called. Statue in the Louvre. Of Pentelic marble. Formerly in Rome, in the Palazzo Savelli, later in the Villa Montalto (?). Purchased of Cardinal Savelli for Louis XIV., in 1685, and by him placed at Versailles, whence it was subsequently removed to the Louvre. RESTORATIONS : The head, which is ancient but does not belong to the statue, the end of the nose, the lower lip, chin, and occiput ; also the left shoulder and arm, half the right forearm and the hand, the right leg down to ankle, and...
Page 64 - XLVI ; etc. Apollo is represented as a boy amusing himself by striking at a lizard on the tree beside him. In the right hand should be an arrow, to correspond with Pliny's description of a statue by Praxiteles (NH xxxiv, 70) : " He made also a young Apollo with an arrow, on the alert for a lizard that is creeping towards him, which they call the ' Sauroktonos
Page 76 - Rome in the i6th century. Formerly in the Villa Ludovisi, from which it was carried to the Capitol by Clement XII. (1730-1740.) RESTORATIONS: The end of the nose, the right hand and arm, part of the left knee, the toes, and part of the plinth, including the sword and a portion of the horn. PUBLISHED : Bouillon, Musee des Antiques, Vol. II, pi. XX ; Baumeister, Denkmdler, II, figs. 1408, 1409 ; Nuova Descrizione del Museo Capitolino, 1882, p. 231 ; Wolters" Friederichs, No. 1421 ; etc. Although this...
Page 70 - This figure was one of the chief promoters of sculpture during the Renaissance. Michael Angelo regarded it with enthusiastic admiration, and declared himself its pupil. Its influence has not declined with the development of modern knowledge of Greek Art, as it still retains its place among the grandest statues of Rome.
Page 108 - The investigations into the history of this statue which have been made recently by the authorities of the Berlin Museum have stripped it of its most distinctive feature, by showing that the uplifted arms, in which many generations have seen and admired the Greek attitude of prayer, do not belong to the original figure, but are a very skilful modern restoration, which is thought to have been made while the statue was in France, during the reign of Louis XIV., and to indicate merely what was the restorer's...
Page 107 - Venice in the :6th century. In the I7th century, the " Praying Boy " was in France, the property of the Surintendant Foucquet By his son it was sold to Prince Eugene of Savoy at Vienna, 1717, after whose death it passed into the possession of Prince Wenzel Liechtenstein, by whom it was sold to Frederic the Great in 1747. It was then placed at Potsdam (Sans-Souci), and later in Berlin. Napoleon I. carried it to Paris, whence it was subsequently restored to Berlin. RESTORATIONS : Both arms to the shoulders,...
Page 54 - CATALOGUE GALLERY OF ART AND ARCH/EOLOGY. PART I. SCULPTURE. A. (1-102) Ancient Sculpture. I. STATUES AND BUSTS. 1 Sophocles, the Greek tragic poet. Original of Greek marble, in the Lateran Museum, Rome. Found at Terracina, a town on the coast between Rome and Naples, a few years before 1839, when the statue was presented by Count Antonelli of Terracina to Pope Gregory XVI., who placed it in the Lateran Museum. The nose, the right hand, both feet with the base, the lower part of the garment, and...
Page 71 - Zeitung, 1862, p. 2 59 ; etc. See also Michaelis, Ancient Marbles in Great Britain, p. 417. It is easy to believe that this statue is an excellent portrait of the greatest of Greek orators. The combination of resolution and weariness in the face, the peculiar conformation of the mouth, and the slight, weak body, correspond to Plutarch's description of Demosthenes, who is here represented in the latter part of his life, yet with features wrinkled more by toil and trouble than by age. The attitude...
Page 76 - ... and figure shows that she is in the full movement of the chase, and just about to draw an arrow from her quiver. At her side leaps a stag or hind, which is designed to be merely a symbol of the chase. This statue bears a striking resemblance to the Apollo Belvedere (No. 2), not only in the fineness of the execution and the unusually long and slender proportions, but even in details, such as the pattern of the sandals and the family likeness in the faces. This variety of the type of Artemis does...

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