Prenatal Care

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1915 - Infants - 41 pages
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Contents

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5
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III
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IV
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VIII
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Page 2 - The act establishing the bureau provides that it shall investigate and report upon all matters pertaining to the welfare of children and child life among all classes of our people, and shall especially investigate the questions of infant mortality, the birth rate, orphanage, juvenile courts, desertion, dangerous occupations, accidents, and diseases of children, employment, and legislation affecting children in the several States and Territories.
Page 2 - The said bureau shall investigate and report to said department upon all matters pertaining to the welfare of children and child life among all classes of our people, and shall especially investigate the questions of infant mortality, the birth rate, orphanage, juvenile courts, desertion, dangerous occupations, accidents and diseases of children, employment, legislation affecting children in the several States and Territories.
Page 2 - That there shall be established in the Department of Commerce and Labor a bureau to be known as the Children's Bureau SEC.
Page 20 - ... and in every way striving to take the best possible care of her own body, so that the digestive, assimilative, and excretory functions are carried on in the highest degree of efficiency, she can be quite sure that the child will be able thereby to build up for himself a sound and normal body and brain. On the other hand, if a woman neglects these plain rules of health and goes through her pregnancy repining or lamenting her condition, paying but slight attention to her own bodily functions. it...
Page 2 - SEC. 3. That there shall be in said bureau, until otherwise provided for by law, an assistant chief, to be appointed by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, who shall receive an annual compensation of...
Page 35 - ... consequent upon taking care of the baby alone causes the milk to diminish in quantity. It is at this time that many a mother concludes that the baby is starving and is very apt to become discouraged and give up nursing as hopeless. This is a great mistake,. It is usually true that the strain of this period is relieved, day by day, as mother and babe gradually become adjusted; her health revives and slowly but certainly things will grow more comfortable, and with this will come the milk.
Page 6 - Siemens, professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the University of California. This monograph is addressed to the average mother of this country. There is no purpose to invade the field of the medical or nursing professions, but rather to furnish such statements regarding hygiene and normal living as every mother has a right to possess in the interest of herself and her children. A standard of life for the family high enough to permit a woman to conserve her strength for her family, if she knows...
Page 2 - The said bureau shall have authority to investigate and report to the said department upon all matters pertaining to the welfare of women in industry. The director of said bureau may from time to time publish the results of these investigations in such a manner and to such extent as the Secretary of Labor may prescribe.
Page 20 - Many women do not realize until the sixth ol eighth week that they are pregnant. Investigation has shown that the form of the child is established by the beginning of the third month, therefore disturbing events which occur in the later months plainly can have no effect. But it must not be assumed that the mother is a passive instrument in the process of embryonic and fetal growth. The harm which a mother may do her child in the uterus is not in the fortuitous, accidental manner above suggested,...
Page 25 - ... or wool and silk, not all wool. Four flannel skirts, " Gertrude " style. Three nightgowns or wrappers of outing flannel, buttoned in front. Eight white slips. Three knit bands, with shoulder straps, part wooL At least 4 dozen diapers. Cloak. Cap. Carriage blanket of crocheted or knitted wool.

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