Preparation aids for the development of Category I quality assurance project plans, Volume 1

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Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1991 - Technology & Engineering - 65 pages
 

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Page ii - FOREWORD Today's rapidly developing and changing technologies and industrial products and practices frequently carry with them the increased generation of materials that, if improperly dealt with, can threaten both public health and the environment. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged by Congress with protecting the nation's land, air, and water resources. Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible...
Page ii - Laboratory is responsible for planning, implementing, and managing research, development, and demonstration programs to provide an authoritative, defensible engineering basis in support of the policies, programs, and regulations of the EPA with respect to drinking water, wastewater, pesticides, toxic substances, solid and hazardous wastes, and Superfund-related activities.
Page iii - Data collection activities performed for the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency are divided into four categories, depending on the intended use of the data. Quality Assurance (QA) Project Plans are written to ensure that project needs will be met and that quality control procedures are sufficient for obtaining data of known quality.
Page ii - Congress with protecting the nation's land, air, and water resources. Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. These laws direct the EPA to perform research to define our environmental problems, measure the impacts, and search for solutions. The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory is responsible for planning, implementing,...
Page 1 - I projects include enforcement actions and projects of significant national or congressional visibility. Such projects are typically monitored by the Administrator. Category I projects must produce results that are autonomous; that is, results that can prove or disprove a hypothesis without reference to complementary projects. Category II Projects are those producing results that complement other inputs. These projects are of sufficient scope and substance that their results could be combined with...
Page 1 - In addition, projects that do not fit this pattern, but have high visibility, would also be included in this category. CATEGORY III PROJECTS are those producing results used to evaluate and select basic options, or to perform feasibility studies or preliminary assessments of unexplored areas which might lead to further work. CATEGORY IV PROJECTS are those producing results for the purpose of assessing suppositions. The RREL Technical Project Manager is responsible for assigning the category that...
Page 23 - Comparability is the degree to which one data set can be compared to another. For instance, to evaluate an environmental cleanup process, analyses of the feed and discharge streams must be comparable. Similarly, to perform a nationwide environmental survey, methods used at different locations must be comparable. Comparability is achieved by the use of consistent methods and by traceability of standards to a reliable source. Representativeness is the degree to which a sample or group of samples is...
Page ii - ... engineering basis in support of the policies, programs, and regulations of the EPA with respect to drinking water, wastewater, pesticides, toxic substances, solid and hazardous wastes, and Superfund-related activities. This publication is one of the products of that research and provides a vital communication link between the researcher and the user community.
Page 19 - Be sure to include QA objectives for all matrix types and to indicate the units in which these QA objectives are given. Summary tables are very helpful to the laboratory which must meet these objectives. Because precision and accuracy can be measured in various ways, explain the method to be used.
Page 18 - DETERMINING QA OBJECTIVES QA objectives must be defined in terms of project requirements, and not in terms of the capabilities of the intended test methods. Of course, the QA objectives must be achievable by available methods, and for this reason it is important that the laboratory review the QA objectives. When QA objectives exceed the capabilities of available methods, either the methods must be modified or the test plan must compensate for these deficiencies.

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