Primary Love: The Elemental Nature of Human Love, Intimacy, and Attachment

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University Press of America, 2010 - Psychology - 154 pages
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In Primary Love, Dr. Klein describes love and intimacy as they evolve in the context of family relations from birth to maturity in adulthood. Once the original attachment and the loving, intimate bond between a mother and her infant-child are established, primary love is founded and secured. Every relationship of love and intimacy formed thereafter has - as its foundation, nature, and design - the original, pristine, loving relationship encountered in the very earliest period of life. When two adults form a mature, intimate relationship, it is the unconscious wish of both partners to recapture and claim the bliss and the ecstasy of primary love, nestled securely in a mother's loving and ministering arms. Dr. Klein's view of love and intimacy is that which is found in the ideal marriage and family, fully acknowledging that the pure and "perfect" marriage and family does not exist. Yet, the "perfectly" described nature of marriage and the family serves as an ideal toward which to strive, for the ideal provides the ultimate of pleasure and reward in the human encounter of love.
 

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Contents

This Thing We Call Love
1
Chapter 1 Love and the Subjective World of the Infant
7
Chapter 2 Love and Motherhood
16
Chapter 3 Love and the Mutuality of MotherInfant Experience
24
Chapter 4 Love and Fatherhood
32
Differentiation and Integration in Toddlerhood
42
Chapter 6 Love and the Family Triangle
51
Chapter 7 Love and the Adolescent Experience
66
Chapter 8 Falling in Love
86
Chapter 9 The Mature Love and Sexuality of Adulthood
100
Chapter 10 The Loss of a Loved One
113
Chapter 11 Primary Love in Summary
126
Afterword
143
Notes
147
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About the author (2010)

Randall S. Klein has been a psychotherapist and an educator for thirty years, serving currently as a correctional psychologist with the State of Nevada. In addition to lecturing at the college and university levels, including the College of Southern Nevada, Dr. Klein serves as a private, pre-elementary, preparatory teacher of children ages two through five years. He balances his life and career between the two homes of Las Vegas, Nevada and Tombstone, Arizona.

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