Primitive Symbolism, as Illustrated in Phallic Worship: Or the Reproductive Principle

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G. Redway, 1885 - Phallicism - 68 pages
 

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Page 12 - On the Genius of George Cruikshank/ reprinted from the Westminster Review, is a piece of work Well calculated to drive a critic of these days to despair. How inimitable is its touch ! At once familiar and elegant, serious and humorous, enthusiastically appreciative, and yet just and clear-sighted ; but, above all, what the French call personnel.
Page 39 - A young man, near six feet high, performed the rites of Venus with a little girl about eleven or twelve years of age, before several of our people, and a great number of the natives, without the least sense of its being indecent or improper, but, as appeared, in perfect conformity to the custom of the place. Among the spectators were several women of superior rank, particularly...
Page 8 - The smoker should be grateful to the compilers of this pretty little volume No smoker should be without it, and anti-tobacconists have only to turn over its leaves to be converted." — Pall Mall Gazette. "Something to please smokers; and non-smokers may be interested in tracing the effect of tobacco— the fatal, fragrant herb— on our literature.
Page 49 - ... licentiousness ; but it is impossible to believe that depravity of manners would ever have led among any people to the establishment of religious ceremonies. It is probable, on the contrary, that this custom was first introduced in times of simplicity, that the first thought was to honour the deity in the symbol of life which it has given us. Such a ceremony may have excited licentiousness among youths, and have appeared ridiculous to men of education in more refined, more corrupt, and more enlightened...
Page 49 - A similar remark has been made by Voltaire. Speaking of the worship of Priapus, he says, " our ideas of propriety lead us to suppose that a ceremony which appears to us so infamous could only be invented by licentiousness ; but it is impossible to believe that depravity of manners would ever have led among any people to the establishment of religious ceremonies. It is probable, on the contrary, that this custom was first introduced in times...
Page 17 - The Heptameron; OB, Tales and Novels of Margaret, Queen of Navarre. Now first done completely into English prose and verse, from the original French, by ARTHUR MACHEN.
Page 22 - ... household labours. A carpenter does the like homage to his hatchet, his adze, and other tools ; and likewise offers sacrifices to them. A Brahman does so to the style with which he is going to write ; a soldier to the arms he is to use in the field ; a mason to his trowel.
Page 11 - JONES and WJ LINTON. A new Edition. With Photographic Portrait of the Poet. "This remarkable poet affords nearly the most striking instance of neglected genius in our modern school of poetry. His poems are full of vivid disorderly power.
Page 18 - Tamerlane and Other Poems. By Edgar Allan Poe. First Published at Boston in 1827 and now First Republished from a Unique Copy of the Original Edition, with a Preface. By Richard Herne Shepherd. London : George Redway : MDCCCLXXXIV. The poor little volume is now one of the bibliophile's "nuggets...
Page 47 - The reverence, as well as worship, paid to the phallus in the early ages had nothing in it which partook of indecency : all ideas connected with it were of a reverential and religious kind. When Abraham, as mentioned in Genesis, in asking his servant to take a solemn oath, makes him lay his hand on his parts of generation (in the common version, " under his thigh"), it was that he required as a token of his sincerity his placing his hand on the most revered part of his body ; as, at the present day,...

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