Principle-centered Leadership

Front Cover
Summit Books, 1991 - Psychology - 334 pages
3 Reviews
Ineffective people try to manage their time around priorities, says Steven R. Covey, whereas effective people lead their lives and manage their relationships according to principles-natural laws and governing values that are universally valid. Leadership is the ability to apply these principles to problems, resulting in quality, productivity, profitability and win-win relationships.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Mohammedkb - LibraryThing

The theme of Principle-Centred Leadership is to become a leader by centering oneself on principles, values, and natural laws rather than on external centers such as family, money, possessions, enemies ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - markdeo - LibraryThing

Very good to have in tandem with "The 7 habits of highly effective people."Provides tremendous insight on human nature. Provides a great foundation for Management and how to utilize your people effectively. I highly recommend Stephen Covey's books. Read full review

Contents

A PrincipleCentered Approach
13
PERSONAL AND INTERPERSONAL
27
Characteristics of PrincipleCentered Leaders
33
Copyright

36 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1991)

Stephen R. Covey was born on October 24, 1932, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received a degree in business administration from the University of Utah, an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, and a D.R.E. from Brigham Young University. He was a teacher and administrator at Brigham Young University. In 1983, he founded the Covey Leadership Center, a training and consulting concern. He wrote numerous books on leadership, personal and organizational effectiveness, and family and interpersonal relationships. His best known book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People: Restoring the Character Ethic, first published in 1989. His other books include Principle Centered Leadership; First Things First: To Live, to Love, to Learn, and to Leave a Legacy; Daily Reflections for Highly Effective People; Seven Habits of Highly Effective Families; The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness; and The 3rd Alternative. He received the Thomas More College Medallion and the Utah Symphony Fiftieth Anniversary Award in 1990, and the McFeely Award of the International Management Council for contributions and service in 1991. He died from injuries sustained in a bicycle accident on July 16, 2012 at the age of 79.

Bibliographic information