Principles of Domestic Taste: A Lecture Delivered in the Yale School of Fine Arts, Winter Term, 1877

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Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, printers, 1877 - Aesthetics - 24 pages
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Page 24 - ... architecture ; and this incongruity the author does not hesitate to sanction, thus giving up what seems to me to be an essential principle of domestic taste. No one need live in such a house that the furnishing of it, if in good taste, must be incongruous with the building itself. As to intrinsic beauty, the old Greek and Roman forms of furniture, than which nothing has ever been conceived more beautiful, were gracefully curving, yet did not lack solidity— the curves giving, probably, greater...
Page 22 - In the sphere of what is called industrial art, use and beauty are, in theory at least, closely associated : for not only has the humblest article of manufacture, when honestly designed, a picturesque interest of its own, but no decorative feature can legitimately claim our admiration without revealing by its very nature the purpose of the object which it adorns.
Page 13 - There, walls were books ; and the sweet witch, Painting, had there the rooms made rich With knights, and dames, and loving eyes Of heav'n-gone kindred, sweet and wise ; Of bishops, gentle as their lawn, And sires, whose talk was one May-dawn. Last, on the roof, a clock's old grace...
Page 22 - Gothic furniture is very naturally associated with everything that is incommodious and pedantic, let me briefly explain what I had hoped would have been apparent to all who have read my book with attention, viz., that I recommend the readoption of no specific type of ancient furniture which is unsuited, whether in detail or general design, to the habits of modern life.
Page 16 - ... has been already as well or better done. If they originate nothing, their employers and patrons are most to be blamed, since the spirit which actuates these must be the main-spring of all their efforts. The Greek feeling for beauty, the Greek mind, so interpenetrated with the perception of natural forms, and motive powers, and so moulded and disciplined by patriotism and philosophic studies, called forth all the glories of Grecian art. Nor should I run the risk of the criticisms of those having...
Page 7 - ... classifies architectural deceits under three heads : 1. the suggestion of a mode of structure, or support, other than the true one, as in pendants of late Gothic roofs, 2. the painting of surfaces to represent some other material than that of which they actually consist (as in marbling of wood), or the deceptive representation of sculptured ornament upon them, and 3. the use of cast, or machine-made, ornament. Again, as home is for repose, nothing should find place in or about it which is suggestive...
Page 13 - Not to specify other particulars, I only add under this head that, notwithstanding time's changes are sure, eventually, to VOL. XXXVL 21 bring their own interruptions and marrings of the domestic scene, there should be throughout the earthly home a moderation, a reserve, even an intentional neglect of some things, in order that it may be true to itself as a place of memories of what is past and gone, as well as of forecast of immortality. A lavish profusion, or an over-finely drawn study of details,...
Page 8 - In domestic architecture, how many towers do we see which, by their position or construction, rather threaten to crush and destroy than defend ! how many garlands of joinery which seem made on purpose to conduct a consuming flame, some day, along the eaves of the house ! how often are entrance-porches so built as to endanger the heads of those who venture under them ! If one enters in safety, how little of solid durability, or restfulness of aspect, meets one within ! not unfrequently one finds door-openings...
Page 12 - ... there is room enough and to spare ; guest-chambers not left in cheerless neglect, or made receptacles for rubbish, but, by their orderliness and finish of appointment, showing constant readiness for occupation ; and a room for the hospitable board large in proportion to other rooms of the house — a point in which the ancient Greeks and Romans are an example for us, by their large "triclinia" ; as are, also, our English ancestors, by their banqueting-halls. All these things are requisite, but...
Page 15 - ... great measure due to such correspondences as we are now considering, that English homes of all classes, at least in the country, where alone the Englishman is at home, are so homelike? Alas that the greater liberty to vary, which Americans enjoy, through freedom from traditional restraints, should be sacrificed to a dull sameness ! whence come our insipid cityblocks, even outside of cities; our private galleries of art, purchased on some conventional principle, not expressive of individual liking;...

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