Prisoners' Rights: Principles and Practice

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Taylor & Francis, Mar 10, 2011 - Social Science - 304 pages
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Prisoners’ Rights: Principles and Practice considers prisoners’ rights from socio-legal and philosophical perspectives, and assesses the advantages and problems of a rights-based approach to imprisonment. At a time of record levels of imprisonment and projected future expansion of the prison population, this work is timely.

The discussion in this book is not confined to a formal legal analysis, although it does include discussion of the developing jurisprudence on prisoners’ rights. It offers a socio-legal rather than a purely black letter approach, and focuses on the experience of imprisonment. It draws on perspectives from a range of disciplines to illuminate how prisoners’ rights operate in practice. The text also contributes to debates on imprisonment and citizenship, the treatment of women prisoners, and social exclusion.

This book will be of interest to both undergraduate and postgraduate students of penology and criminal justice, as well as professionals working within the penal system.

 

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Contents

from social death to citizenship
1
rights versus discretion
26
3 The increasing importance of international human rights law and standards
49
4 Prison conditions
69
5 Procedural justice
111
6 Contact with the outside world
141
7 The right to equality
173
the right to vote
211
making room for prisoners rights
240
Notes
253
Bibliography
258
Prison Service Orders
270
Index
271
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Susan Easton is Reader at Brunel Law School.

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