Privacy in Britain

Front Cover
Bucknell University Press, 1979 - Law - 266 pages
0 Reviews
Beginning with an analysis of a landmark article in an American law journal, this study describes the growth of claims to a right to privacy in Britain and contrasts the nature of the British and American interpretations of the precedents of this right.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Warren and Brandeis Argument
19
Judicial Precedent in Britain
38
Legislative Precedents before the First World War
60
Early Complaints about Privacy
71
Privacy and Individual Rights
86
Privacy and the Press
101
First Attempt at Legislation
136
The Lyon and Walden Bills
161
The Younger Committee and After
185
Epilogue
206
Table of Cases
208
List of Abbreviations in Notes
212
Notes
213
Selected Bibliography
245
Index
259
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 20 - The intensity and complexity of life, attendant upon advancing civilization, have rendered necessary some retreat from the world, and man, under the refining influence of culture, has become more sensitive to publicity, so that solitude and privacy have become more essential to the individual ; but modern enterprise and invention have, through invasions upon his privacy, subjected him to mental pain and distress, far greater than could be inflicted by mere bodily injury.
Page 32 - The principle which protects personal writings and any other productions of the intellect or of the emotions, is the right to privacy, and the law has no new principle to formulate when it extends this protection to the personal appearance, sayings, acts, and to personal relation, domestic or otherwise.
Page 28 - Anne, professing by its title to be <For the encouragement of learning,' and using the words 'taken the liberty,' in the preamble, whether it operated in augmentation or diminution of the private rights of authors, having left them to some extent untouched, it was found that the common law, in providing for the protection of property, provided for their security, at least before general publication by the writer's consent." Knight Bruce, VC, in Prince Albert v.

References to this book

All Book Search results &raquo;

Bibliographic information