Private Sector Training--who Gets it and what are Its Effects?: Prepared for the U.S. Department of Labor

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Rand, Jan 1, 1986 - Employees - 85 pages
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Training after high school in the United States was studied to determine who is trained and the extent of training, as well as economic consequences of training. Data sources were the Current Population Survey (CPS) of 1983, the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) of Labor Market Experience (NLS Young Men, Mature Men, and Women cohorts for 1967 to 1980); and the Employment Opportunities Pilot Projects Surveys (training of the economically disadvantaged in 1979 and 1980). It was found that nearly 40% of both men and women in the CPS reported undertaking training to improve current job skills. For a given 2-year period in the NLS, the fractions of young men, career women, and mature men reporting some training were about 30%, 24%, and 10%, respectively. For all three groups, the employer was the single most important source of training. Only 11% of the disadvantaged sample reported some training over a similar time interval, with a relatively low proportion getting training from company sources. Also assessed are analyses concerning factors that determine the probability of getting training for each source and type of training, and the effects of training on earnings, earnings growth, and employment stability. (SW)

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Contents

Section
1
THE DETERMINANTS OF TRAINING
18
THE ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF TRAINING
43

3 other sections not shown

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