Problems in Philosophy

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1885 - Metaphysics - 222 pages
 

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Page 204 - Wisdom and spirit of the universe ! Thou soul that art the eternity of thought, That givest to forms and images a breath And everlasting motion, not in vain By day or star-light thus from my first dawn Of childhood didst thou intertwine for me The passions that build up our human soul ; Not with the mean and vulgar works of man, But with high objects ; with enduring things, With...
Page 222 - Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by the law; ye are fallen from grace. 5 For we through the Spirit wait for the hope of righteousness by faith.
Page 219 - Its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests, upon the great truth. that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.
Page 106 - ... heat. It is not truth alone that maintains the vitality of growing points in the mind, but truth and feeling. Feelings that are alien to the facts soon alter our conception of the facts, and so the facts shake us off and escape us. We are not masters, because we have lost the true word of command. Personal liberty is like liberty in the state. Its safe possession is one of profound obedience to deeply implanted principles. It is not, therefore, the less liberty or of less worth. On the one side...
Page 50 - ... or matter, — the distant or the near, — we know, and can know, only in so far as we possess a faculty of knowing in general ; and we can only exercise that faculty under the laws which control and limit its operations. However great, and infinite, and various, therefore, may be the universe and its contents, — these are known to us, not as they exist, but as our mind is capable of knowing them.

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