Problems of Secondary Education

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Houghton Mifflin, 1917 - Education, Secondary - 333 pages
 

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Page 251 - The school also offers a four-year " vocational course," based on graduation from the sixth grade, thus paralleling the seventh and eighth years of the elementary school and the first two years of the high school. The number of students enrolled in this course in the second term, 1918-19. was 515, of whom 7 were taking a fifth year's work.
Page 318 - EDUCATION, BOSTON, MASS. The efforts now being made in various states to reorganize curricula of training and instruction for children from twelve to fourteen or fifteen years of age constitute undoubtedly the most significant and important of contemporary movements in education. We are justified in assuming without argument that the scope and character of that instruction and training will be materially modified in the near future. Readjustments in administrative plans, restatement of purposes,...
Page 171 - English literature. One result of this merging of two different subjects is that the means and methods of teaching one tend to deflect and neutralize those appropriate to the other. So evident has this become to me that, were I responsible for the administration of a high school at the present time, I believe that my first step would be to place the teaching of literature on the one hand, and on the other all that pertains to English expression, under charge of different teachers, who would probably...
Page 313 - ... would not be advocating these things if I did not believe that they would make for better parenthood of the future, a capacity for enjoying leisure, and ability to see the world in which we live in a new light, — if I did not believe it was just as essential as for that possible day of national need. In view of the existing uncertainty as to the scope and character of desirable military training, it is suggested that special attention should be given to the following possibilities : (a) The...
Page 320 - ... twelve to fourteen years of age are variable to such an extent that, if conditions of educational administration permitted, a number of courses of training and instruction, dissimilar as to many important elements and also even as to quality of results expected in common studies, should be provided. b) The number and variety of subjects of training and instruction suited to and desirable for at least some important groups of pupils of these ages are now far too large to be properly included in...
Page 313 - ... years of age; (c) the promotion at state expense of summer camps with much physical, and some military, training, which, taking boys at school age — preferably sixteen to eighteen — might be continued into young manhood, at first on a voluntary, and if feasible, later on a compulsory basis for all.
Page 174 - To a larger extent we feel that literary selections . . . should be studied for their own sake, and should be used primarily as a means of enhancing interest in good literature, as such, rather than as cadavers in the study of literary anatomy. Bonser" would use literature as an enrichment to pupils...
Page 320 - ... in everincreasing measure found it desirable to increase the range of their studies and to give pupils wider latitude in making individual programs of study. d) While it may safely be assumed that for some years to come at least the individual programs of instruction and training for all pupils of twelve to fourteen years of age will be required to contain studies or elements common to all, nevertheless it is even now expedient and desirable in wellorganized schools, and, of course, subject to...
Page 84 - ... related to one life-situation. The chief educational function of a project is to translate information into conduct. It arouses interest, since there are many reservoirs from which interest may flow, being tied up with life-situations. Dr. Snedden, in his Problems of Secondary Education, states that the keynote of the newer education in these fields is to be found in the development of facilities for obtaining practical experience under conditions as nearly approximating those of the actual vocation...
Page 229 - culture' course in mathematics which should prove attractive to students seeking to inform themselves about the world in which they live; this to include some account of the evolution of .-mathematics as a human tool and as a means of interpretation, as well as a survey of modern applications of mathematics to the understanding of the universe and to the work of the world. Just as many of us can respond to operas, epics, and great paintings without being artists in these fields, so I think many could...

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