Problems of the Present South: A Discussion of Certain of the Educational, Industrial, and Political Issues in the Southern States

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Young People's Missionary Movement of the United States and Canada, 1909 - Education - 335 pages
 

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Page 25 - that according to the ancient and fundamental laws of this Kingdom, the government is, and ought to be, by King, Lords, and Commons.
Page 87 - I commend to you a careful perusal of the words of Mr. E. Gardner Murphy, who, like yourself, is a devoted Southerner, and is equally zealous to promote the highest interest of that section: " Have prosperity, peace, and happiness ever been successfully or permanently based upon indolence, inefficiency, and hopelessness? Since time began, has any human thing that God has made taken damage to itself or brought damage to the world through knowledge, truth, hope, and honest toil?
Page 3 - It may be quite true that some negroes are better than some white men ; but no rational man, cognizant of the facts, believes that the average negro is the equal, still less the superior, of the average white man. And, if this be true, it is simply incredible that, when all his disabilities are removed, and our prognathous relative has a fair field and no favour, as well as no oppressor, he will be able to compete successfully with his bigger-brained and smaller-jawed rival, in a contest which is...
Page 187 - ... bread. To the negro, just now, the opportunity, by honest labor, to earn his bread is very much more important than the opportunity to cast his vote. The one opportunity is secondary, the other is primary ; the one is incidental, — the greater...
Page 215 - ... of intelligence, virtue, economic efficiency and capacity for political self-control. We recognize the value of efforts hitherto made to solve our educational problems, both as respects the methods to be used, and also as regards the sheer quantity of the work to be done. But we also find in the facts as presented at the sessions of this Conference the imperative need of renewed efforts on a larger scale; and we also find in the improved financial outlook of the country and in the advancing state...
Page 275 - It cannot base its social distinctions on an assertion of universal "inferiority" — for in that case every gifted or truly educated negro might shake the structure of social usage. It bases its distinctions partly upon the far-reaching consideration that the racial stock of the two families of men is so unlike that nothing is to be gained and much is to be lost from the interblending of such divergent types; partly upon the broad consideration of practical expediency, in that the attempt to unite...
Page 61 - Of all colored pupils one (1) in one hundred was engaged in secondary and higher work, and that ratio has continued substantially for the past twenty years. If the ratio of colored population in...
Page 215 - ... advancing state of public opinion better hopes than ever before of a larger response to this greater need. As the first great need of our people is adequate elementary instruction, and as this instruction must come to children so largely through mothers and women teachers in their homes and primary schools, we desire to emphasize our belief in the wisdom of making the most liberal investments possible in the education of girls and women.
Page 309 - In illustration of the loss which occurred to Mr. Murray in publishing the first volume of the history, the following letter may be given, as addressed to the editor of the Morning Chronicle : — John Murray to the Editor of tlie Morning Chronicle.
Page 34 - The doctrine of race integrity, the rejection of the policy of racial fusion, is, perhaps, the fundamental dogma of southern life. It is true that the animalism of both races has at times attacked it. The formative dogmas of a civilization are reflected, however, not in the vices of the few, but in the instincts, the laws, the institutions, the habits of the many. This dogma of the social segregation of these races, challenged sometimes by fault of the black man, challenged sometimes by fault of...

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