Proceedings

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Page 292 - But though we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed.
Page lvi - Happy is he that hath the God of Jacob for his help, whose hope is in the LORD his God...
Page 348 - IN FRANCE, BUT LEFT THAT COUNTRY FOR HIS RELIGION AND CAME TO SETTLE IN THIS ISLAND, WHERE HE WAS SWALLOWED UP IN THE GREAT EARTHQUAKE IN THE YEAR 1692 AND BY THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD WAS BY ANOTHER SHOCK THROWN INTO THE SEA, AND MIRACULOUSLY SAVED BY SWIMMING UNTIL A BOAT TOOK HIM UP ; HE LIVED MANY YEARS AFTER IN GREAT REPUTATION, BELOVED BY ALL WHO KNEW HIM, AND MUCH LAMENTED AT HIS DEATH.
Page cxii - ... or that of those sovereigns amongst whose deeds are recorded the massacre of St. Bartholomew and the revocation of the edict of Nantes ? The...
Page lxxxiii - words of art" as he calls them, which Philemon Holland, a voluminous translator at the end of the sixteenth and beginning of the seventeenth century...
Page 364 - I cannot, as that good commander did, be so vain as to hope either myself or the place for which I serve can be preserved from the general inundation which this Bill we are now debating lets in on the liberties of my native country and countrymen, and therefore be unconcerned for the good of England, provided Bristol were safe. To hope for and expect happiness in life when all mankind but myself are...
Page 365 - For there is no entertaining the courts of St. James and Whitehall, the palaces of our hereditary kings, for the' great noise and croaking of the Frog-landers.
Page iii - President, in the Chair. The minutes of the Annual General Meeting held on May 24th, and of the Extraordinary General Meeting held on August i6th, 1900, were read and confirmed.
Page 129 - It was entertained," says one who took part in the scene,* " with much joy and a general consent of the whole House, and sounded forth with the voices of them all, withal lifting up their hats in their hands as high as they could hold them, as a visible testimony of their unanimous consent, in such sort that the like had scarce ever been seen in Parliament.
Page 123 - That when divers foreigners had come hither on account of religion & desired to be admitted in communion with the rest of the Dutch Church, the Queen hearing of it, commanded the Lord Mayor to disperse them from London. Whereupon they applied to the Bishop of London to represent their case to the Queen...

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