Proceedings, Issue 35

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Page 197 - ... attempted to show, with the growers themselves. If this practice of putting up inferior fruit for market would be abandoned, the difficulty of marketing our grapes would be almost overcome. I have not thus discussed the difficulties and abuses of shipping our grapes for the sake of finding fault, but in the sincere hope that some means may be found of overcoming the difficulties and correcting the abuses. However, I have no remedy to offer which I conceive to be a panacea for all the ills we...
Page 202 - I move that a committee of five be appointed by the chair to draft a constitution and by-laws for a society for [here state the object], and that they report at an adjourned meeting of this assembly.
Page 92 - ... Pp. 32, figs. 17. Farmers' Bulletin No. 243. March 20, 1906 3,000 Cassava. By SM Tracy, MS, Formerly Director of the Mississippi Agricultural Experiment Station. Pp. 32, figs. 11. Farmers' Bulletin No. 167. Reprint, April 6, 1906 10,000 The Prevention of Stinking Smut of Wheat and Loose Smut of Oats. By Walter T. Swingle, Physiologist in Charge of Plant Life; History Investigations. Pp. 16, figs. 7. Farmers
Page 27 - This species might be called a medium-sized scale, resembling somewhat the olive scale in form. It has been known under various names in the Eastern States, and attacks the peach, plum, apple, sugar maple, hawthorn, and many other plants, showing it to be a general feeder, and it has been reported from about fourteen states and from Canada. Great care should be taken in the inspection of nursery stock, for the young scale insects could be easily overlooked. The scurvy bark louse (Chionaspis furfurus)...
Page 94 - There is not the slightest indication of the cross fertilization by the wild fig, such as a wild or scraggling growth or difference in the color of the bark. The growth of the tree is very upright and the color of the wood is the same. The small size of the ripe fruit, I ascribe to the lateness of maturing and the youth of the tree. I have brought with me some of the leaves of the trees which bore the ripe figs, to which I invite your attention. In respect to proper pruning I have nothing that I...
Page 94 - ... a pigeon's egg, cuneate or wedge shape, but rather flatter than the White Adriatic, with a short stem. Their color was a lively yellow, the flesh amber, but containing only a few seeds, which were very small. The taste was deliciously sweet. The other and immatured fruit was well packed with fleshy tissue, and except that it was green, did not differ in appearance or shape from the ripe fig. One fact to which I wish to call attention, and a very important one, in relation to the necessity of...
Page 93 - ... soil. They have made a wonderful growth, the trunks being from four to six inches in diameter, and the trees ranging from ten to fifteen feet high. They have never been irrigated, but have been cultivated. They have borne this year an abundance of fruit, which, while it remains on the trees, has not matured.
Page 93 - Choice Layers," or "London Layers." I have ordered sent to you a box of "Imperial," which are the best in the market. There is no charge for them. I should be only too glad if in your wonderful soil and climate you should successfully raise a fig equal to the Smyrna fig. Very respectfully yours, HK THURBER. The...
Page 45 - I would like to say a few words in its advocacy. .1 may preface my remarks by saying that I am the oldest horticultural commissioner in the State of California. I have served continuously for nineteen years, and must necessarily have had some experience in the work of a county horticultural commissioner. For one, I contend that the present law is good, it is sufficient, it covers the ground as well as any law that might be enacted at the coming Legislature. I do not say that the law is perfect ;...
Page 8 - ... that you are an average set of people, but I mean — and I do not intend to natter you by this statement — that you are far above the average in intelligence, in enterprise, in ability, and such people we are glad to welcome here to the Capital City, and I trust you will make yourselves at home, and that when you go away you will carry with you a pleasant impression of the city which you have visited and in which you have held your convention. Ladies and gentlemen, I thank you for your attention....

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