Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Volume 36

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Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 1885 - Electronic journals
"Publications of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia": v. 53, 1901, p. 788-794.
 

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Page 300 - IF IT could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed, which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.
Page 300 - TO SUPPOSE that the eye with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admitting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest degree.
Page 300 - ... if further, the eye does vary ever so slightly, and the variations be inherited, which is certainly the case ; and if any variation or modification in the organ be ever useful to an animal under changing conditions of life, then the difficulty of believing that a perfect and complex eye could be formed by natural selection, though insuperable by our imagination, can hardly be considered real.
Page 364 - Memoranda of the origin, plan, and results of the field and other experiments conducted on the farm and in the laboratory of Sir JB Lawes at Rothamsted, Herts.
Page 359 - On the contents of a bone cave in the island of Anguilla (West Indies), 27 pp., 1883 (Smithsonian Contributions, no.
Page 371 - List of the Vertebrated Animals now or lately living in the Gardens of the Zoological Society of London, 1872 Ditto.
Page 324 - Act of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, entitled "An Act to provide for the incorporation and Regulation of certain corporations...
Page 253 - The slaves of Brazil are a very strong and robust class of men, and of temperate habits. Their food consists of rice, fruits, and bread of coarse flour, and from the farrenia root. They endure great hardships, and carry enormous burdens on their heads, a distance of from a quarter of a mile to a mile, without resting.
Page 300 - ... animal under changing conditions of life, then the difficulty of believing that a perfect and complex eye could be formed by natural selection, though insuperable by our imagination, should not be considered as subversive of the theory. How a nerve comes to be sensitive to light, hardly concerns us more than how life itself originated...
Page 29 - ... material. While considering the effect of the presence of so large a sponge-growth at the very inlet to the supply-pumps, Mr. Potts stated that this particular species was conspicuous among the known North American sponges by its great relative density and the small proportion of its sarcode or flesh. Its decay, therefore, at the termination of its period of summer growth would be a less cause of pollution to the water-supply than that of any other sponge Moreover, from recent investigations...

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