Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Volume 24

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Vol. 12 (from May 1876 to May 1877) includes: Researches in telephony / by A. Graham Bell.
 

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Page 486 - Premium to the author of any important discovery or useful improvement in light or heat, which shall have been made and published by printing, or in any way made known to the public, in any part of the continent of America, or any of the American islands; preference always being given to such discoveries as, in the opinion of the Academy, shall tend most to promote the good of mankind...
Page 190 - Place's work) is, with few and slight exceptions, just what we could have wished to see — an exact and careful translation into very good English — exceedingly well printed, and accompanied with notes appended to each page, which leave no step in the text of moment unsupplied, and hardly any material difficulty either of conception or reasoning unelucidated.
Page 193 - ... is instantly repeated, verified, and commented upon in Germany, and, we may add too, in Italy. We wish the obligation were mutual. Here, whole branches of continental discovery are unstudied, and indeed almost unknown, even by name. It is in vain to conceal the melancholy truth. We are fast dropping behind. In mathematics we have long since drawn the rein, and given over a hopeless race. In chemistry the case is not much better.
Page 192 - Ingersoll showed his comrade a solution which his father had prepared of a problem that the boys had been at work upon. Some error, real or conceived, was pointed out in the work, which was reported by Ingersoll to his father. ' Bring me that boy who corrects my mathematics...
Page 481 - If any book shall be lost or injured, the person to whom it stands charged shall replace it by a new volume or set, if it belongs to a set...
Page 162 - Li Be B C N O F Na Mg Al Si P S Cl K Ca Sc Ti V Cr Mn Fe Co Ni Cu Zn Ga Ge...
Page 293 - ... photographs are made differs very considerably from the foregoing. I take the forming teeth from the jaws of embryos, at or nearly at the time of birth, while the tissue is still warm. These are placed in a quarter of one per cent, to one-half of one per cent, solution of chromic acid, which is changed daily for three or four days. At the end of this time the edges of the dentine that were calcified are found to be sufficiently softened to make a number of sections. The teeth are taken from the...
Page 194 - I am sure that hours, and perhaps days, of hard study will alone enable me to discover how it plainly appears.
Page 463 - But such work as that of Clansins is not measured by counting titles or pages. His true monument lies not on the shelves of libraries, but in the thoughts of men, and in the history of more than one science.
Page 162 - In some cases they are too great, as in the first group, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine ; in others too slight, as we have just remarked, for the last terms of the third group. Though it may be generally true that the properties of bodies are subject to periodic modifications with the increase of their atomic weights, the law of these modifications escapes our observation, and seems to be of a complicated nature ; for, on the one hand, the atomic weights of successive elements vary within...

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