Proceedings of the Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences, Volume 5

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Page 5 - Shell globose, somewhat umbilicated, irregularly costate, light horn color, nearly pellucid; spire rather small, conical; whorls four to four and one-half, convex, somewhat Hattened above, giving rather a shouldered appearance to the whorls, rapidly increasing in size, the last whorl being inflated, with numerous rather marked transverse costae, minutely wrinkled ; suture somewhat deep, regularly impressed; aperture elongately ovate, effuse, approaching patulous, pearly white within; outer lip simple,...
Page 261 - ... committee was appointed to draft suitable resolutions, viz. : HC Fulton, JH Harrison, and Dr! McCowen. Committee was instructed to furnish a copy to the press, and to send one to the family. A motion prevailed that the Academy be closed for thirty days out of respect to the memory of our late Ex-President, Mr. CE Putnam. August 26, 1887. — REGULAR MEETING. President CE Harrison in the chair; eleven members present. The committee on resolutions relating to the death of Mr. CE Putnam reported...
Page 128 - Falco sparverius Linn. American Sparrow-hawk. Summer resident; common from March until October. Nests in cavities in trees. Commonly met with along country roads, where it perches upon telegraph poles and dead trees. It is not uncommon to see half a dozen or more of these birds at one time, hovering over a field, and ever and anon darting down to seize some unfortunate field-mouse, grasshopper, or reptile. SUBFAMILY PAXDIONIN^E.
Page 134 - At Boonesboro a pair of large Flycatchers were seen in the timber, which I scarcely doubt were of this species. Having no gun with me at the time, I was unable .to get them and did not meet with the species elsewhere." (Mem. Bost. Soc., i, 1868). ' ' Has until the last two years always been considered as a rarity in eastern Nebraska, where it occurs as a migrant. During the past month of May, 1905, it has been reported frequently, and in some localities as common, one Omaha observer having...
Page 252 - Section 4. Honorary members shall be selected from persons eminent for their attainments in science on whom the society may wish to confer a compliment of respect, and shall have all the privileges of regular members except those of voting and holding office. They shall not exceed forty (40) in number, not to exceed twenty (20) of whom shall be residents and citi/ens of the United States.
Page 174 - ... Habitat: — A low-branching shrub, the long divergent branches inclined to support themselves on adjoining bushes, but never decumbent. Flowers in April, fruit July; only known from a single locality in the interesting botanical district of the Napa Valley. Though closely allied to C. prostratus, with which, in herbarium specimens, it is easily confounded, it is clearly distinct in habit and foliage, as well as a widely different geographical range. Like all the species of this Section, the...
Page 168 - ... beneath, triple-nerved from the base, with inconspicuous midveins, more or less strongly revolute, margins entire, but glandularly ciliate; inflorescence short pedunculate, not exceeding the leaves — flowers not seen — fruit 4 mm. broad, smooth, with resinous exocarp, cocci with blunt apical crests. Habitat: — Known only from fruiting specimens collected on the summit of Mount Tamalpais, Marin County, July, 1886, by Mrs. MK Curran; closely allied to C. cordulatus, but differing in the character...
Page 139 - Just before sunrise vast flocks begin to rise out of the swamps and radiate in all directions towards the inland corn-fields, where they spend the day, returning again to the swamps before sunset. These flocks are often a quarter of a mile in width, and are more than an hour in passing — a great, black band slowly writhing like some mighty serpent across the heavens, in either direction its extremities lost to view in the dim and distant horizon. Not unfrequently three or four such vast flocks...
Page 251 - ARTICLE II ELECTION OF OFFICERS AND MEETINGS SECTION 1 . The officers shall be elected by ballot at the annual meeting, and a majority shall be required for choice. Proxies shall not be allowed. The term of office shall be for one year, and until a successor shall be elected. Vacancies occurring during the year shall be filled by the Managers. SECTION 2. The...
Page 172 - ... and paler beneath; inflorescence diffusely thyrsoid, prolonged, leafy below, flowers white, with very slender pedicels; fruit smooth, with thin, resinous exocarp, and rounded cocci. Habitat: — A tall shrub, 10-15 feet high, loosely branched above, somewhat pendent, the prolonged inflorescence delicate snow-white, flowers in May, fruit July. Santa Cruz Mountains, near Ben Lomond; first collected by Dr. CL Anderson, 1887, whose name heretofore so intimately connected with the botany of Santa...

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