Proceedings of the Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences, Volume 5

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Page 240 - If all the books in the world , except the Philosophical Transactions, were destroyed, it is safe to say that the foundations of physical science would remain unshaken, and that the vast intellectual progress of the last two centuries would be largely, though incompletely, recorded.
Page 240 - ... and the name of philosopher, or lover of wisdom, is given to those who lead such a life. But it is by no means necessary that a man should do nothing else than study known truths and explore new, in order to earn this high title. Some of the greatest philosophers in all ages have been engaged in the pursuits of active life ; and an assiduous devotion of the bulk of our time to the work which our condition requires, is an important duty, and indicates the possession of practical wisdom.
Page 200 - ... cease their labors. To this end we should present every inducement and encouragement to scientific study, and offer every facility possible for that purpose, by having the museum and library in as good working condition as possible, and by our meetings and publications interest the people in science. During the past year we have been called upon to mourn the loss of two members, death having taken from us Dr. RJ Farquharson and Dr. George Knglemann.
Page 252 - Section 4. Honorary members shall be selected from persons eminent for their attainments in science on whom the society may wish to confer a compliment of respect, and shall have all the privileges of regular members except those of voting and holding office. They shall not exceed forty (40) in number, not to exceed twenty (20) of whom shall be residents and citi/ens of the United States.
Page 240 - Some of the greatest philosophers, in all ages, have been engaged in the pursuits of active life ; and an assiduous devotion of the bulk of our time to the work which our condition requires, is an important duty, and indicates the possession of practical wisdom. This, however, does by no means hinder us from applying the rest of our time, beside what nature requires for meals and rest, to the study of science ; and he who, in whatever station his lot may be cast, works his day's work, and improves...
Page 232 - The following papers were read by title and referred to the publication committee: "Causes of Infant Mortality and Methods of Prevention,
Page 255 - SEC. 9. Special meetings shall be called by the President whenever he may deem it necessary, or whenever requested by the Clearing House Committee, or in writing by five members of the Association. SEC.
Page 139 - Just before sunrise vast flocks begin to rise out of the swamps and radiate in all directions towards the inland corn-fields, where they spend the day, returning again to the swamps before sunset. These flocks are often a quarter of a mile in width, and are more than an hour in passing — a great, black band slowly writhing like some mighty serpent across the heavens, in either direction its extremities lost to view in the dim and distant horizon. Not unfrequently three or four such vast flocks...
Page 194 - Orcutlil, n. sp. Branches flexible, dull reddish, with short hispid pubescence; leaves petiolate, broadly orbicular to oblong-cordate, usually rounded obtuse, 30 to 40 mm. in length, often as broad, irregularly glandular-serrate, sparingly hispid above, strongly triple-nerved beneath, with prominent hairy ciliate veins; inflorescence axillary, oval scarcely exceeding the leaves...
Page 128 - Falco sparverius Linn. American Sparrow-hawk. Summer resident; common from March until October. Nests in cavities in trees. Commonly met with along country roads, where it perches upon telegraph poles and dead trees. It is not uncommon to see half a dozen or more of these birds at one time, hovering over a field, and ever and anon darting down to seize some unfortunate field-mouse, grasshopper, or reptile. SUBFAMILY PAN'DIONlN-ffi.

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