Proceedings of the Essex Institute, Volumes 1-2

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Essex Institute, 1856 - Natural history
 

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Page 239 - Name of the Council Established at Plymouth in the County of Devon, for the Planting, Ruling, Ordering and Governing of New England in America...
Page 15 - Each Member shall be entitled to take from the Library, one folio, or one quarto, or two of any lesser fold, with the plates belonging to the same, upon...
Page 132 - Curse ye Meroz, said the angel of the Lord, curse ye bitterly the inhabitants thereof; because they came not to the help of the Lord, to the help of the Lord against the mighty.
Page 16 - ... by the Library Committee. No person shall lend any book belonging to the Institute, excepting to a member, under a penalty of one dollar for each offence.
Page 128 - When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod. By fairy hands their knell is rung ; By forms unseen their dirge is sung ; There Honour comes, a pilgrim gray, To bless the turf that wraps their clay ; And Freedom shall awhile repair, To dwell a weeping hermit there.
Page 16 - On or before the first Wednesday in May, all books shall be returned to the Library, and a penalty of five cents per day shall be imposed for each volume detained.
Page 269 - We do hereby promise to carry ourselves in all lawful obedience to those that are over us, in church or commonwealth, knowing how well pleasing it will be to the Lord, that they should have encouragement in their places, by our not grieving their spirits through our irregularities.
Page 240 - ... to the knowledge and obedience of the only true God and Saviour of mankind, and the Christian I.) it h, which in our royal intention and the adventurers...
Page 14 - No fellow or member who shall be in arrears for one year shall be entitled to vote or be eligible to any office in the Academy.
Page 95 - It was not accounted a strange thing in those days to drink water, and to eat samp or hominy without butter or milk. Indeed, it would have been a strange thing to see a piece of roast beef, mutton, or veal ; though it was not long before there was roast goat.

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