Proceedings of the Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow, Volume 16

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Page 45 - With the True Book of the Learned Synesius, a Greek Abbot. taken out of the Emperour's Library, concerning the Philosopher's Stone.
Page 205 - The local conditions of safety are, above all, these two : — (1) that, by appropriate structural works, all the excremental produce of the population shall be so promptly and so thoroughly removed that the inhabited place, in its air and soil, shall be absolutely without faecal impurities ; and (2) that the water supply of the population shall be derived from such sources, and conveyed in such channels, that its contamination by excrement is impossible.
Page 204 - ... it imparts to enormous volumes of water the power of propagating the disease. When due regard is had to these possibilities of indirect infection, there will be no difficulty...
Page 158 - The Signatory Powers of the present Act recognize the obligation to insure the establishment of authority in the regions occupied by them on the coasts of the African Continent sufficient to protect existing rights, and, as the case may be, freedom of trade and of transit under the conditions agreed upon.
Page 204 - Probably, under ordinary circumstances, the patient has no power of infecting other persons except by means of these discharges ; nor any power of infecting even by them, except in so far as particles of them are enabled to taint the food, water, or air which people consume.
Page 204 - ... infective. Probably, under ordinary circumstances, the patient has no power of infecting other persons except by means of these discharges ; nor any power of infecting even by them, except in so far as particles of them are enabled to taint the food, water, or air, which people consume. Thus, when a case of Cholera is imported into any place, the disease is not likely to spread, unless in proportion as it finds, locally open to it, certain facilities for spreading by indirect infection.
Page 204 - England shows itself so little contagious, in the sense in which small-pox and scarlatina are commonly called contagious, that, if reasonable care be taken where it is present, there is almost no risk that the disease will spread to persons who nurse and otherwise closely attend upon the sick.
Page 152 - Ottomans, wishing, in a spirit of good and mutual accord, to regulate the conditions most favourable to the development of trade and civilization in certain regions of Africa, and to assure to all nations the advantages of free navigation on the two chief rivers of Africa flowing into the Atlantic Ocean...
Page 204 - Happily for mankind, cholera is so little contagious, in the sense in which small-pox and scarlatina are commonly called contagious, that, if reasonable care be taken where it is present, there is scarcely any risk that the disease will spread to persons who nurse and otherwise closely attend upon the sick.
Page 204 - ... the effluvia which those matters evolve ; secondly, that the infective power of choleraic discharges attaches to whatever bedding, clothing, towels and like things, have been imbued with them, and renders these things, if not thoroughly disinfected...

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