Proceedings of the Royal Physical Society of Edinburgh, Volume 8

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Page 218 - ... compact, very hard, infusible, hornstone-like siliceous rock, with splintery fracture and dark color, and is impregnated with carbonaceous material and iron oxide. It occurs in beds made up of layers from 1 to 4 inches in thickness, and is traversed by numerous joints, and veined with quartz. . . . The Kieselschiefer beds are, in almost all the cases I have seen, intensely crumpled, and bent into sharply-defined folds, in a way which shows them to have been quite plastic at the time of their...
Page 12 - As before remarked, if such a bank lay a few fathoms submerged, the simple growth of the coral, without the aid of subsidence, would produce a structure scarcely to be distinguished from a true atoll...
Page 57 - M'Cloyd of Lewis, with certain reistit muttan, and mony reistit foulis. Within this ile there is ane chapell, callit St. Ronay's chapell, unto quhilk chapell, as the ancients of the country alledges, they leave an spaid and ane shuil, quhen any man dies, and upon the morrow findes the place of the grave markit with an spaid, as they alledge.
Page 60 - ... that of a Kamschatkan hut ; receiving no other light than that from the smoke hole, being covered with ashes, festooned with strings of dried fish, filled with smoke, and having scarcely an article of furniture. Such is life in North Rona ; and though the women and children were half naked, the mother old, and the wife deaf, they appeared to be contented, well fed, and little concerned about what the rest of the world was doing.
Page 266 - ... community of descent is the hidden bond which naturalists have been unconsciously seeking, and not some unknown plan of creation, or the enunciation of general propositions, and the mere putting together and separating objects more or less alike.
Page 21 - ... of calcareous sediment. Some of this sediment accumulates in steep submarine banks, like sand-dunes, which shift to and fro as winds and currents vary ; though by the action of the carbonic acid of the sea-water they are apt to be cemented into solid slopes, some of which have an angle of as much as 33". So great is the destructive and transporting influence of the sea under the combined or antagonistic working of tides, currents, and wind-waves, that the whole mass of the reef as well as the...
Page 6 - ... one of the most impressive generalisations with which geology, fertile in such achievements, had yet astonished the world. The theory proposed by Darwin, now so familiar, connected all the types of reef together as stages of one long process, every step in which could be illustrated by actual examples. At the one end stood the fringing-reefs, some of which might only lately have been started upon a racently upraised sea-bottom.
Page 28 - Again, as Mr. Murray has shown, the inorganic deposits of the ocean-floor are composed of volcanic debris with a singular absence of the minerals that constitute the usual crystalline rocks of our continents. No satisfactory proofs of a general subsidence have been obtained from the region of coral-reefs, except from the structure of the reefs themselves, and this is an inference only, which is now disputed. From the nature of the case, indeed, traces of subsidence can hardly be expected. A few examples...
Page 58 - ... thikest and throwing some handfulls of sand over there heads as if it were hail, they take them be the Necks : Of the grease of these fowls especiallie the soline goose, they make ane excellent oyle called the Gibanirtich, which is exceeding good for healing of anie sore or vound or cancer either on man or beast. This I myself found true by experience by applying of it to the legg of a young gentleman which had been inflamed and cankered for the space of two years : and his father being a trader...
Page 175 - ... propelled. They are not launched forwards, as a sailor would say, end on, but tumbled forwards broadside. They come rolling down a river in flood, or upwards on the shore in a time of tempest, as a hogshead rolls down a declivity. In the boulder-clay, on the contrary, most of the pebbles that bear the mark of their transport at all were not rolled, but slid-den forward in the line of their longer axis. They were launched, as ships are launched, in the line of least resistance, or as an arrow...

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