Proceedings of the United States National Museum, Volume 13

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Smithsonian Institution Press, 1891 - Science
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Page 252 - It may be of interest to mention in this connection that the coast fishermen of Newfoundland capture the young of the seagulls (generally of the larger species) while they are yet nestlings, and carefully rear them until they are full grown, feeding them chiefly on fish.
Page 204 - ... junction with the base of the shell. Aperture obliquely ovate, nearly circular, and almost as broad as high. Lip slightly thickened and reflected, or simple, varying in this respect ; more reflected and aperture more effuse at the columella. Parietal wall in the heavier examples calloused, the callus connecting with the inner edges of the outer lip above and below. Shell rather fragile, thin, translucent; surface smooth and shiny, and sculptured with fine incremental lines. Color pale horn to...
Page 456 - Province to be so that the b jundaries thereof shall be as follows : commencing at the the intersection of the International boundary dividing Canada from the United States of America, by the centre line of the road allowance between the twentyninth and thirtieth ranges of townships lying west of the first principal meridian in the system of Dominion land surveys ; thence northerly following upon the said centre line of the said road allowance, as the same is or may hereafter be located, defining...
Page 517 - I have often watched, and it presents the most amusing spectacle I have yet witnessed in bird life. At first the birds may be seen standing about in ordinary attitudes, when suddenly one of them lowers its head, spreads out its wings nearly horizontally and its tail perpendicularly, distends its air sacs, and erects its feathers, then rushes across the
Page 131 - No. XIV. Birds from the coasts of western North America and adjacent islands, collected in 1888-89, with descriptions of new species.
Page 204 - Shell orbicular, moderately depressed, spire slightly elevated, apex obtuse, number of whorls four to four-and-a-half, rounded. Umbilicus narrow, showing the penultimate whorl, though partially covered by the reflection of the lip at the point of junction with the base of the shell. Aperture obliquely ovate, nearly circular, and almost as broad as high. Lip slightly thickened and reflected, or simple, varying in this respect ; more reflected and aperture more effuse at the columella. Parietal wall...
Page 302 - They could be tracked," says Todd, "up and down the tree, but to no great distance from it, and were most likely in search of food." In a contribution to the West American Scientist (1891, p. 242) Todd again calls attention to the tracks he has seen around the trees, but specifically disclaims positive knowledge that they were made by Phenacomys. Wilder gives it as his opinion that they must occasionally come to the ground, though...
Page 380 - ... RENSSELAER contributes to the Proceedings of the US National Museum an interesting paper on the playing cards used in Japan. They are more distinctly original, she says, than any others, and show no marks of the common origin which the Italian, Spanish, German, French, Hindoo, and Chinese cards display. Forty-nine in number, they are divided into twelve suits of four cards in each suit. One card is a trifle smaller than the rest of the pack, and has a plain white face not embellished with any...
Page 516 - The advent of the grouse on the still snow-covered plains might prove premature, but that they find a good friend in the wild prairie rose (Rosa blanda). It is abundant everywhere, and the ruddy hips, unlike most fruits, do not fall when ripe, but continue to hang on the stiff stems until they are dislodged by the coming of the next season's crop. On the Big Plain stones of any kind are unknown, and in nearly all parts of Manitoba gravel is unattainable during the winter ; so that the '
Page 514 - In the Fall they are tolerably tame, but in the severe cold more shy ; frequently perch on the tops of the highest poplars, out of moderate gun-shot, and will not suffer a near approach. They sometimes, when disturbed in this situation, dive into the snow ; but the sportsman is equally...

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