Professional Papers of the Corps of Royal Engineers, Volume 7

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Page 217 - ... rule, the garrisons of the redoubts and the number of troops required to man the retrenchments were at the commencement calculated on an allotment of two men per yard running of parapet for all lines; but after some time, this calculation was deemed too considerable, and the numbers were fixed at two men per yard running for all front lines, and one man per yard for all rear lines, deducting for the spaces occupied by the artillery; an addition to or deduction from these numbers being made by...
Page 71 - It is proper, then, to inquire at the outset in what way the knowledge of Materia Medica is to be made subservient to the treatment of disease. In accordance with the homoeopathic law, we select for the cure of each individual case of disease that remedy of which the pathogenetic...
Page 141 - It is not easy, however, to see why a boat firing at the water level should succeed, while the machine guns in the tops of the Penelope and Invincible failed for...
Page 283 - The piers supporting the roof structure are separate from the armoured wall. The roof is of the usual girder construction, and bomb-proof throughout. There is to this, and to all the other sea forts, an entrance port into which, in preparing for action, a massive armoured shield on...
Page 283 - Fort may he taken as the first example of battery, with walls composed wholly of iron. It is oval in form, 144 ft. long and 114 ft. broad, and stands on a mass of masonry on a rocky bed. The floor is about 16 ft. above high-water mark. It was constructed to mount fourteen 38-ton guns and four 18-ton guns firing through small ports, 21 ft. 9 in. from centre to centre. The ironwork was commenced in 1867 and finished in 1870. There are four thicknesses of 5-in. plates about the port, and three supported...
Page 286 - The safe load of the upper gun floor, and of the roof, is equal to s mass of concrete 10 ft.
Page 223 - The details of the design for a fort should be influenced by the nature of the ground on which it is to be built, and it is necessary to inspect the site carefully before beginning the plans.
Page 155 - It is necessary to make a few remarks on the subject of the turret, as this is admitted to be the most perfect method of mounting guns.
Page 127 - I have never heard a different opinion than that they would get as close as possible and pour in as heavy and rapid a fire as they could...
Page 122 - ... problem of reorganizing a situation of disturbed values. In this portion of the article I propose to go over the ground in more detail, dealing with some explicitness with each phase of the situation. Before taking up the interpretation of the logical categories of fact, meaning and agreement, it may be well to say a few words on the nature of the disturbed and disordered situation for the sake of rectifying which the reflective process takes place. A quotation from a recent critic affords a...

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