Program Evaluation Theory and Practice, First Edition: A Comprehensive Guide

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Guilford Press, Mar 1, 2012 - Social Science - 621 pages

This book has been replaced by Program Evaluation Theory and Practice, Second Edition, ISBN 978-1-4625-3275-9.

 

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Contents

Chapter OneIntroduction to Evaluation
3
Chapter TwoFraming Evaluation
33
Part IIHISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY EVALUATION PARADIGMS BRANCHES THEORIES AND APPROACHES
49
Chapter ThreeThe Postpositivist Paradigm and the Methods Branch
57
Chapter FourThe Pragmatic Paradigm and the Use Branch
89
Chapter FiveThe Constructivist Paradigm and the Values Branch
133
Chapter SixThe Transformative Paradigm and the Social Justice Branch
161
Part IIIPLANNING EVALUATIONS
219
Chapter ElevenStakeholders Participants and Sampling
409
Chapter TwelveData Analysis and Interpretation
439
Part IVIMPLEMENTATION IN EVALUATION
473
Chapter ThirteenCommunication and Utilization of Findings
475
Chapter FourteenMetaEvaluation and Project Management
511
Chapter FifteenPerennial and Emerging Issues in Evaluation
537
Glossary
557
References
563

Chapter SevenWorking with Stakeholders
223
Chapter EightEvaluation Purposes Types and Questions
261
Chapter NineEvaluation Designs
303
Chapter TenData Collection Strategies and Indicators
353
Author Index
593
Subject Index
601
About the Authors
621
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About the author (2012)

Donna M. Mertens is Professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Research at Gallaudet University, where she teaches advanced research methods and program evaluation to deaf and hearing students. She received the Distinguished Faculty Award from Gallaudet. The primary focus of her work is transformative mixed methods inquiry in diverse communities, with priority given to the ethical implications of research in pursuit of social justice. A past president of the American Evaluation Association (AEA), Dr. Mertens provided leadership in the development of the International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation and the establishment of the AEA Diversity Internship Program with Duquesne University. She has received AEA?s highest honors for service to the organization and the field, as well as for her contributions to evaluation theory. She is the author of several books and is widely published in major professional journals. Dr. Mertens conducts and consults on evaluations in many countries, including Egypt, India, South Africa, Botswana, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, and Costa Rica.˙Amy T. Wilson is Director of International Programs at the Mill Neck Family of Organizations, where she leads a team of deaf educational specialists who share their expertise, knowledge, and technical skills with parents, educators, and professionals in economically poor countries. Dr. Wilson was a professor in the Department of Educational Foundations and Research at Gallaudet University for 14 years.˙After living in developing countries and noting the poor assistance people with disabilities were receiving from U.S. development organizations, she developed Gallaudet?s MA degree in International Development. The degree, which is the only one of its kind in the United States, focuses on the inclusion of people with disabilities in development assistance programs and in nongovernmental, federal, and faith-based development organizations both in the United States and overseas. Dr. Wilson was Program Director of the International Development Program; she also taught deaf and hearing students research and evaluation, theory and practice of international development, micropolitics, community development with people with disabilities, multicultural education, and gender, disability, and development. Dr. Wilson evaluates and advises development organizations and agencies (e.g., U.S. Agency for International Development, the InterAmerican Development Bank, the World Bank, and the Peace Corps) about the inclusiveness of their programs, as well as their effectiveness with various disability communities.

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