Progress and Poverty

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 2005 - Business & Economics - 420 pages
To those who, seeing the vice and misery that spring from the unequal distribution of wealth and privilege, feel the possibility of a higher social state, and would strive for its attainment.-Henry George, Progress and PovertyWhy do we have ups and downs in the national economy? Why does poverty continue to exist while a minute number of Americans enjoy a staggering increase in their personal wealth year after year? What went wrong in a country that professes to be dedicated to the proposition that we are all created equal?As timely now as it was when it was written in 1871, Progress and Poverty is an honest and fascinating look at the financial order and the increasingly distorted distribution of income and wealth of life in America. George lays out simply and elegantly what the underlying problem is and how we might solve it.AUTHOR BIO: HENRY GEORGE (1839-1897) was a noted American economist and founder of the single-tax movement. He first outlined the doctrine in the pamphlet Our Land and Land Policy in 1871 and later wrote the more elaborate treatise Progress and Poverty (1879), which sold millions of copies all over the world.
 

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Contents

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Copyright

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Page 12 - So long as all the increased wealth which modern progress brings goes but to build up great fortunes, to increase luxury and make sharper the contrast between the House of Have and the House of Want, progress is not real and cannot be permanent.
Page 39 - Such cases, however, are not very frequent, and in every part of Europe, twenty workmen serve under a master for one that is independent...
Page 11 - And, unpleasant as it may be to admit it, it is at last becoming evident that the enormous increase in productive power which has marked the present century and is still going on with accelerating ratio, has no tendency to extirpate poverty or to lighten the burdens of those compelled to toil.

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