Progressive Medicine: A Scientific and Practical Treatise on Diseases of the Digestive Organs and the Complications Arising Therefrom

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Page 306 - So that if a suitable quantity be taken, and if both action and reaction are allowed to exhaust themselves before the dose be repeated, more manifestation of life, represented by more excretion and more consequent renewal of the body, takes place in a given time with the alcoholic drink than without. There has been a positive gain in vitality.
Page 326 - ... use of fermented liquors, there is the same universal indication of their serving a profound physiological purpose, and supplying a common want. It is no argument that, because these things have been abused they serve no purpose in man's economy. On the contrary, the fact of their use in all time, and that no saccharine liquid, or juice of ripe fruit, can be exposed to the air without spontaneous and almost immediate fermentation, are striking evidences of design and a useful purpose.
Page 325 - And with regard to the use of fermented liquors, there is the same universal indication of their serving a profound physiological purpose, and supplying a common want. It is no argument that, because these things have been abused, they serve no purpose in man's economy. On the contrary, the fact of their . use in all time, and that no saccharine liquid or juice of ripe fruit can be exposed to the air without spontaneous and almost immediate fermentation, are striking evidences of...
Page 289 - It was formerly supposed that the great complexity of these substances was sustained by what was called the vital principle; but. although the cause which determines the growth of organized beings is still a perfect mystery, we now know that the materials of which they consist are subject to the same laws as mineral matter, and the complexity may be traced to the peculiar qualities of carbon.
Page 335 - F. It is then put once more upon the fire and gently boiled for a few minutes. Lastly it is carefully strained, to remove any particles of husk, and then it is fit for the child's food. The composition of the food according to Dr. Liebig is as follows : (Letheby.) Plastic matter. Carbonaceous matter. Ten ounces of milk - - .40 oz. - -. - 1.00 oz. One ounce wheat flour - .14 " - - - - 0.74 " One ounce malt flour - .07...
Page 298 - We found great capillary congestion of the pons, and this solves the problem why veratrum viride is so valuable in spasms of a congestive nature. In puerperal convulsions that have for their origin some emotional cause, and when there is excessive cerebral hyperaemia, veratrum viride is, of all remedies, the first to be thought of.
Page 40 - The following are these different distinctions : — 1. Electricity is the only irritant which can excite, at one time sensation, and at another contraction, according to the direction in which it traverses a nerve. 2. The electric current alone, in passing transversely across a nerve, produces no phenomena due to the excitability of the nerve. 3. The electric current has no effect on the nerves, that is, it neither causes contraction nor sensation, when its action on the nerve is prolonged. 4. The...
Page 304 - ... important, of the actions of alcohol, in a therapeutic point of view, is the influence which it produces on the circulating system. That the administration of alcohol increases the power of the heart, diminishes the frequency of its beat, and augments the force of its...
Page 341 - ... blood and muscle are coagulated and destroyed at from 158 to 165 (say 170). He therefore advises that all cooking operations, in respect of meat, should be limited to 170. His directions are, that in boiling meat it should be introduced into the vessel when the water is in a state of brisk ebullition, and that the boiling should be kept up for a few minutes. The pot is then to be placed in a warm situation, so that the water is maintained at from 158 to 165.
Page 298 - Veratrum viride, by affecting the pneumogastric nerve (vagus), and by paralyzing its functions, produces congestion and inflammation in every organ and tissue to which it is distributed.

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