Properties of Matter

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Adam and Chas. Black, 1885 - Matter - 320 pages
 

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Page 91 - Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change that state.
Page 110 - that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle, with a force whose direction is that of the line joining the two, and whose magnitude is directly as the product of their masses, and inversely as the square of their distances from each other.
Page 132 - That gravity should be innate, inherent, and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking can ever fall into it. Gravity must be caused by an agent acting constantly according to certain laws, but whether this agent...
Page 157 - A Defence of the Doctrine touching the spring and weight of the air ... against the objections of Franciscus Linus, etc.
Page 131 - It is inconceivable that inanimate brute matter should without the mediation of something else, which is not material, operate upon and affect other matter without mutual contact, as it must be if gravitation, in the sense of Epicurus, be essential and inherent in it.
Page 131 - You sometimes speak of gravity as essential and inherent to matter. Pray do not ascribe that notion to me; for the cause of gravity is what I do not pretend to know, and therefore would take more time to consider of it.
Page 160 - The number of equal spaces in the shorter leg, that contained the same parcel of air diversely extended. B. The height of the mercurial cylinder in the longer leg, that compressed the air into those dimensions. C. The height of the mercurial cylinder, that counterbalanced the pressure of the atmosphere. D. The aggregate of the two last columns, B and C, exhibiting the pressure sustained by the included air. E. What that pressure should be according to the hypothesis, that supposes the pressures and...
Page 305 - But that there should be exactly so much matter, and no more, in every molecule of hydrogen, is a fact of a very different order. We have here a particular distribution of matter, a collocation — to use the expression of Dr. Chalmers — of things which we have no difficulty in imagining to have been arranged otherwise.
Page 288 - Spencer records his conviction that 'the chemical atoms are produced from the true or physical atoms by processes of evolution under conditions which chemistry has not yet been able to produce.
Page 88 - ... wick, gives but little of the yellow light; while if the wick be of cotton it gives a considerable quantity, and that for an unlimited time. (I have found other instances of a change of colour in flames, owing to the mere presence of the substance, which suffers no diminution in consequence. Thus a particle of muriate of lime on the wick of a spirit-lamp will produce a quantity of red and green rays for a whole evening without being itself

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