Property Rights and the Environment: Social and Ecological Issues, Volume 94

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Susan Hanna, Mohan Munasinghe
World Bank Publications, 1995 - Business & Economics - 164 pages
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The collection of papers in this book and its companion volume, Property Rights in Social and Ecological Context: Case Studies and Design Applications, (6) examine the relationships between people, the environment, and property rights and the ways in which a given social and ecological context affects those relationships. The papers are products of a research program at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm. The main objective of the program was to convene social scientists and natural scientists to address research questions in their full social and ecological dimensions.The program's participants addressed five general issues related to property rights and the environment: (1) the design of governance systems for sustainability; (2) the relationship between equity, stewardship, and environmental resilience; (3) the use of traditional knowledge in resource management, (4) the mechanisms that link people to their environments, and (5) the role played by population and poverty. The companion volume presents case studies that address questions of design application in those five areas.(6) Also available: Property Rights in a Social and Ecological Context: Case Studies and Design Applications. (ISBN 0-8213-3416-6) Stock No. 13416.
 

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Page 110 - Subject to its national legislation, respect, preserve and maintain knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and local communities embodying traditional lifestyles relevant for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity and promote their wider application with the approval and involvement of the holders of such knowledge, innovations and practices...
Page 16 - Adding together the component partial utilities, the rational herdsman concludes that the only sensible course for him to pursue is to add another animal to his herd. And another; and another . . . But this is the conclusion reached by each and every rational herdsman sharing a commons. Therein is the tragedy. Each man is locked into a system that compels him to increase his herd without limit - in a world that is limited.
Page v - Institutions are the rules of the game in a society or, more formally, are the humanly devised constraints that shape human interaction.
Page 110 - Convention, to be pursued in accordance with its relevant provisions, are the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources...
Page 107 - Indigenous people and their communities and other local communities have a vital role in environmental management and development because of their knowledge and traditional practices. States should recognise and duly support their identity, culture and interests and enable their effective participation in the achievement of sustainable development.
Page 36 - Appropriation rules restricting time, place, technology, and/or quantity of resource units are related to local conditions and to provision rules requiring labor, material, and/or money.
Page 108 - Protection of the oceans, all kinds of seas, including enclosed and semi-enclosed seas, and coastal areas and the protection, rational use and development of their living resources 18.
Page 110 - Agenda 21 and the non-legally binding authoritative Statement of Principles for a Global Consensus on the Management, Conservation and Sustainable Development of all Types of Forests were adopted.
Page 40 - Nested enterprises. Appropriation, provision, monitoring, enforcement, conflict resolution, and governance activities are organized in multiple layers of nested enterprises.
Page 111 - National forest policies should recognize and duly support the identity, culture and the rights of indigenous people, their communities and other communities and forest dwellers. Appropriate conditions should be promoted for these groups to enable them to have an economic stake in forest use, perform economic activities, and achieve and maintain cultural identity and social organization, as well as adequate levels of livelihood and well-being, through, inter alia, those land tenure arrangements which...

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About the author (1995)

An outstanding authority and author in energy economics and international development, Mohan Munasinghe received his undergraduate education in engineering at Cambridge University and went on to McGill University, receiving a Ph.D. in electrical engineering in 1973. He then turned his attention to economics, receiving an M.A. at Concordia College (Montreal) in 1975. Since that year, he has been division chief for environmental policy at the World Bank in Washington, D.C. His work at the World Bank has related to projects in developing countries concerning energy, electricity, transportation, water, urban infrastructures, and telecommunications. He has been a prolific author, writing nearly 200 technical papers and numerous books and monographs. In addition, Munasinghe has been active in the affairs of his native country, Sri Lanka, where he has served as senior energy advisor to the president, a board member of the Natural Resources, Energy, and Science Authority, governor of the Arthur Clarke Center for Modern Technologies, and founder of the Energy Managers Association. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Sciences of Sri Lanka, the Institution of Electrical Engineers (UK), and the Institute of Engineers of Sri Lanka. Munasinghe's honors include the Surha Gold Medal, 1985 (Lions International); International Award, 1987 (International Association of Energy Economists); and the Prize for Outstanding Contribution, 1988 (Fifth Latin American and Caribbean Conference on Power and Energy).

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