The Prophet

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 1997 - Fiction - 80 pages
2382 Reviews

The Prophet represents the acme of Kahlil Gibran's achievement. Writing in English, Gibran adopted the tone and cadence of King James I's Bible, fusing his personalised Christian philosophy with a spirit and oriental wisdom that derives from the richly mixed influences of his native Lebanon.

His language has a breath-taking beauty. Before returning to his birthplace, Almustafa, the 'prophet', is asked for guidance by the people of Orphalese. His words, redolent with love and understanding, call for universal unity, and affirm Gibran's certainty of the correlated nature of all existence, and of reincarnation. The Prophet has never lost its immediate appeal and has become a ubiquitous touchstone of spiritual literature.

 

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Review: The Prophet

User Review  - Frances Rebello - Goodreads

Beautiful. I love the author's style of writing. Read full review

Review: The Prophet

User Review  - Dennis Podryadchikov - Goodreads

An interesting read that can help challenge teenagers in their thinking and maturation. A poet narrates twenty six fables that touch on different aspects of everyday life, including different ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Kahlil Gibran was a Lebanese artist, poet, and author. Born in Bsharri, Lebanon, Gibran immigrated with his parents to Boston in 1895 before settling in New York City where he studied art and began his literary career, writing in both English and Arabic. His best-known work is The Prophet, published in 1923, which has become one of the best-selling books of all time. Like the majority of Gibran s works, The Prophet dealt with spiritual love and religion. Gibran passed away in 1931.

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