Proposed Department of Education. Hearing...on H.R. 7...April 25-May 2, 1928. 70th Congress, 1st Session

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1928 - 550 pages
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Page 37 - Washington, a department of education, for the purpose of collecting such statistics and facts as shall show the condition and progress of education in the several States and Territories, and of diffusing such information respecting the organization and management of schools and school systems, and methods of teaching, as shall aid the people of the United States in the establishment and maintenance of efficient school systems, and otherwise promote the cause of education...
Page 215 - Yearbook of the Department of Elementary School Principals of the National Education Association, Vol.
Page 292 - The powers reserved to the several states will extend to all the objects, which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties, and properties of the people: and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the state.
Page 113 - Do you favor the creation of a Federal Department of Education with a Secretary in the President's Cabinet?
Page 94 - To bring into closer relation the home and the school, that parents and teachers may cooperate intelligently in the training of the child, and to develop between educators and the general public such united efforts as will secure for every child the highest advantages in physical, mental, social, and spiritual education.
Page 242 - Government demand the creation of a Department of Education with a Secretary in the Cabinet of the President.
Page 244 - We renew our unqualified endorsement of a Department of Education with a Secretary in the President's Cabinet, and Federal aid to...
Page 89 - It is substantially true, that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. The rule indeed extends with more or less force to every species of free government. Who that is a sincere friend to it can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?
Page 527 - The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, in order to pay the debts, and to provide for the common defence and general welfare of the United States...
Page 89 - Nor am I less persuaded, that you will agree with me in opinion, that there is nothing which can better deserve your patronage than the promotion of science and literature. Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness.

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