Prospectus of the History of North Brookfield, Massachusetts: Testimonials of the Value of the Work, and Some Specimens from Its Pages

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Page 25 - ... and philosophical view of the facts which have been detailed, and to submit the ideas that arose in my own mind from such a view, have been often presented. But it would increase the size of a volume already enlarged far, very far, beyond its original design. To trace the history of our ancestors, and transmit a record of their deeds to posterity, is a duty we owe to the past and the future. Such a record must be preserved as invaluable by the immediate descendants and kindred of those, who once...
Page 14 - ... sermons in stones, tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, and good in everything ; and Winter, though her fields are bare and branches leafless, will yield a crop of profitable and pious thoughts.
Page 24 - Important, however, and instructive as is the narrative of past events and the influence they have exerted on the world in civilization and refinement, history is seldom so interesting as when descending from the loftier and more splendid regions of general narration, it dwells for a while in an humbler place, and delights in the details of events of every-day life, and of the history of the people. " The struggles of empires and the convulsions of nations," says a writer, "while they have much of...
Page 25 - ... of New York. In this brief notice of the labors of Mr. Ludewig, reference should be made to the able Introduction accompanying his original work. It extends to twenty pages, in small type, and contains sentiments of which even a native of the country might be proud. It opens with this sentence : " No people in the world can have so great an interest in the history of their country, as those of the United States of North America; for there are none who enjoy an equally great share in their country's...
Page 24 - ... and the knowledge we acquire by it is a creditable kind of ignorance, nothing more. This creditable kind of ignorance is, in my opinion, the whole benefit which the generality of men, even of the most learned, reap from the study of history: and yet the study of history seems to me, of all other, the most proper to train us up to private and public virtue.
Page 24 - ... in Pope's Miscellany. We are fond of preserving, as far as it is in our frail power, the memory of our own adventures, of those of our own time, and of those that preceded it. Rude heaps of stones have been raised, and ruder hymns have been composed, for this purpose, by nations who had not yet the use of arts and letters. To go no...
Page 36 - Witness the honorable Morrison R. Waite, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, at the city of...
Page 37 - My dear Sir,— I am much obliged to you for sending me the copy of Mr.
Page 24 - ... to make an attempt at fine writing, (had it been possible for him to have succeeded, or had he deemed it proper in a town history,) but to relate, in as plain, simple, and intelligible a manner as was within his power, such facts as he deemed most worthy of preservation. The object of local history is to furnish the first elements of general history, to record facts rather than deductions from facts. In these municipalities, — these separate incorporations, — are to be found many of the first...
Page 11 - ШО, in Philadelphia, Pa. ; assistant librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and editor of the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography.

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