Prostitution: Sex Work, Policy and Politics

Front Cover
SAGE Publications, Sep 15, 2009 - Social Science - 219 pages
Many commentators have attempted to analyze and explain the nature of prostitution. However this is the first textbook to offer a complete overview of the way it operates within contemporary society, its characteristics, organizational structures, and cultural contexts. The book also explores how criminal, social, and health policies have sought to regulate and control the selling of sex. Written by leading experts with over 20 years’ experience in researching and teaching on the field, this is a must for all criminology, criminal justice, and sociology students taking modules in sex industry and prostitution studies.
 

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Contents

1 THE SOCIOLOGY OF SEX WORK
1
2 THE CULTURAL CONTEXT OF COMMERCE AND SEX
16
3 SEX WORKERS AND SEX WORK
33
4 CHILDREN YOUNG PEOPLE AND COMMERCIAL SEXUAL EXPLOITATION CSEC
52
5 BUYING SEXUAL SERVICES
75
6 SEX WORKERS LABOUR RIGHTS AND UNIONIZATION
94
7 CRIME JUSTICE AND THE SEX INDUSTRY
111
8 COMMUNITIES SERVICES AND WELFARE
131
9 GLOBALIZATION AND THE SEX TRADE
149
10 RESEARCHING THE SEX INDUSTRY
166
GLOSSARY
187
BIBLIOGRAPHY
190
INDEX
210
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Teela Sanders is Professor of Criminology at the University of Leicester specializing in the cross-sections between gender, crime and justice. She has researched areas relating to the sex industry for 15 years producing eight books and many articles. Her current projects look at digital technologies and the sex industry (www.beyond-the-gaze.com) with a strong impact agenda around netreach and safety guidance for sex workers. She is a strong supporter of Participatory Action Research methods which underpin her research endeavours, working alongside the sex work community to ensure evidence-based policy speaks to the rights agenda. Other work focuses on homicide and mental health with sex workers. The National Ugly Mugs are collaborative partners with her research activities, enabling impact into grassroots activities.

Maggie O’Neill is Chair in Sociology/Criminology in the Department of Sociology, University of York and has conducted participatory and feminist work on sex work with sex workers, practitioners, communities, artists and other researchers since 1989. Her inter-disciplinary research career has developed along a threefold path: the development of cultural, criminological and feminist theory; the development of innovative methodologies for doing social research – including visual, biographical and performative (walking) methodologies (ethno-mimesis); and the development of praxis (policy) interventions in practice and policy. She co-founded and co-chairs the Sex Work Research hub with Rosie Campbell and Teela Sanders. She is a board member of the North East Sex Work Forum, co-founded the Crime Research Network and co-chairs the Migration Research Network at the University of York. Maggie has a long history of conducting participatory, biographical and arts-based research working in collaboration with artists, communities and criminal justice agencies on asylum and migration.

Jane Pitcher completed an ESRC-funded PhD in Social Sciences at Loughborough University which explored the working experiences of sex workers in different indoor settings in Great Britain, drawing on in-depth interviews with adult female, male and transgender sex workers. She has more than

20 years’ research and evaluation expertise in voluntary, academic and public sector organizations, including recently working on a study of internet-based sex work, Beyond the Gaze, with co-researchers at the universities of Leicester and Strathclyde and is co-author of Internet Sex Work: Beyond the Gaze (Palgrave 2017). She has undertaken research and published on sex work and services to sex workers, criminal justice and community safety and labour market disadvantage, as well as teaching a postgraduate module on Feminism and Sex Industries. Her research interests include intimate labour, labour market structures and gender, and policy responses to sex work.

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