Protecting civilians: the obligations of peacekeepers

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Oxford University Press, 2009 - Law - 296 pages
This book examines the obligations of troops to prevent serious abuses of human rights towards civilians under international humanitarian law and international human rights law. It analyzes the duty to intervene to stop the commission of serious abuses of human rights by analyzing the meaning and practical consequences for troops, in terms of civilian protection, of the Article 1 duty to respect and ensure respect for the Geneva Conventions; of the duty to secure human rights (found in most international human rights treaties); and of the duty to restore law and order in an occupation.

The book also analyzes the extent of troops' obligations to provide protection in light of various different operational and legal contexts in and discusses 'grey areas' and lacuna of coverage. A discussion of whether new approaches are needed, for example where operations are undertaken explicitly to protect people from serious violations of their human rights follows; and the book concludes by offering some guidelines for troops faced with such violations.

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Contents

Cold War
6
Humanitarian Objectives
19
Lessons Learned from the Failure to Prevent Genocide
38
Copyright

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About the author (2009)


Siobhan Wills is a College Lecturer at University College Cork

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