Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain

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Harper Collins, Aug 26, 2008 - Science - 336 pages
19 Reviews

"Human beings were never born to read," writes Tufts University cognitive neuroscientist and child development expert Maryanne Wolf. Reading is a human invention that reflects how the brain rearranges itself to learn something new. In this ambitious, provocative book, Wolf chronicles the remarkable journey of the reading brain not only over the past five thousand years, since writing began, but also over the course of a single child's life, showing in the process why children with dyslexia have reading difficulties and singular gifts.

Lively, erudite, and rich with examples, Proust and the Squid asserts that the brain that examined the tiny clay tablets of the Sumerians was a very different brain from the one that is immersed in today's technology-driven literacy. The potential transformations in this changed reading brain, Wolf argues, have profound implications for every child and for the intellectual development of our species.

 

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User Review  - antao - LibraryThing

“Will the split-second immediacy of information gained from a search engine and the sheer volume of what is available derail the slower, more deliberative processes that deepen our understanding of ... Read full review

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User Review  - kristykay22 - LibraryThing

This book explores what the unnatural act of learning to read does to our brains, how that has affected human culture, and what is going on in the brains of people who have trouble putting together ... Read full review

Contents

PART
1
Chapter 2
24
Chapter 3
47
PART II
79
Chapter 6
114
PART III
163
Chapter 8
192
Chapter 9
212
Acknowledgments
231
Notes
237
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About the author (2008)

Maryanne Wolf is a professor of child development at Tufts University, where she is also the director of the Center for Reading and Language Research. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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