Proverbial Philosophy: A Book of Thoughts and Arguments, Volumes 1-2

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Wiley & Putnam, 1846 - Proverbs
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Page 158 - And immediately I was in the spirit; and behold, a throne was set in heaven, and one sat on the throne ; and he that sat was to look upon like a jasper and a sardine stone ; and there was a rainbow round about the throne, in sight like unto an emerald.
Page 103 - The pen, flowing with love, or dipped black in hate, Or tipped with delicate courtesies, or harshly edged with censure, Hath quickened more good than the sun, more evil than the sword, More joy than woman's smile, more woe than frowning fortune ; And shouldst thou ask my judgment of that which hath most profit in the world, For answer take thou this, The prudent penning of a letter.
Page 100 - O books, ye monuments of mind, concrete wisdom of the wisest ; Sweet solaces of daily life ; proofs and results of immortality ; Trees yielding all fruits, whose leaves are for the healing of the nations ; Groves of knowledge, where all may eat, nor fear a flaming sword : Gentle comrades, kind advisers ; friends, comforts, treasures...
Page 134 - If thou art to have a wife of thy youth, she is now living on the earth ; Therefore think of her, and pray for her weal; yea, though thou hast not seen her.
Page 99 - Need to humor no caprice, need to bear with no infirmity, Thy sin, thy slander, or neglect, chilleth not, quencheth not, its love ; Unalterably speaketh it the truth, warped nor by error not interest ; For a good book is the best of friends, the same to-day and for ever.
Page 77 - My thoughts, are they not mine own ? and they leave no mark behind them; And if God so pardoneth crime, how should these petty sins affect him ?— So he transgresseth yet again, and falleth by little and little, Till the ground crumble beneath him, and he sinketh in the gulf despairing. For there is nothing in the earth so small that it may not produce great things, And no swerving from a right line, that may not lead eternally astray.
Page 149 - Now the loud trumpet sounds a charge. The shouts Of eager hosts, through all the circling line, And the wild...
Page 121 - Confidence is conqueror of men ; victorious both over them and in them ; The iron will of one stout heart shall make a thousand quail : A feeble dwarf, dauntlessly resolved, will turn the tide of battle, And rally to a nobler strife the giants that had fled...
Page 150 - Egyptians ; one displaced from its pedestal by enormous roots ; another locked in the close embrace of branches of trees, and almost lifted out of the earth ; another hurled to the ground, and bound down by huge vines and creepers; and one standing, with its altar before it, in a grove of trees which grew around it, seemingly to shade and shroud it as a sacred thing ; in the solemn stillness of the woods, it seemed a divinity mourning over a fallen people.

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