Providence

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Bantam Books, May 1, 1996 - Biography & Autobiography - 175 pages
1 Review
Providence is Quinn's fascinating memoir of his life-long spiritual voyage. His journey takes him from a childhood dream in Omaha setting him on a search for fulfillment, to his time as a postulant in the Trappist order under the guidance of eminent theologian Thomas Merton.  Later, his quest took him through the deep self-discovery of psychoanalysis, through a failed marriage during the turbulent and exciting 60s, to finding fulfillment with his wife Rennie and a career as a writer. In Providence Quinn also details his rejection of organized religion and his personal rediscovery of what he says is humankind's first and only universal religion, the theology that forms the basis for Ishmael.

Providence is an insightful book that address issues of education, psychology, religion, science, marriage, and self-understanding, and will give insight to anyone who has ever struggled to forge and enact a personal spirituality.
 

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Providence: the story of a fifty-year vision quest

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Quinn's novel Ishmael (LJ 12/91) won the Turner Tomorrow Fellowship for fiction, which offers solutions for global problems; the book has since garnered a large and devoted following. Providence is ... Read full review

Review: Providence

User Review  - Abby - Goodreads

It's a quick and easy read so far, though every now and then, true to form, I do have to double back and re-think what I just read. So nuanced. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
9
Section 3
21
Section 4
33
Section 5
45
Section 6
53
Section 7
63
Section 8
77
Section 9
99
Section 10
105
Section 11
137
Section 12
153
Section 13
171
Section 14
179
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Agatha Christie was born in Torquay in 1890 and became, quite simply, the best-selling novelist in history. Her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, written towards the end of the First World War, introduced us to Hercule Poirot, who was to become the most popular detective in crime fiction since Sherlock Holmes. She is known throughout the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language and another billion in 100 foreign countries. She is the author of 80 crime novels and short story collections, 20 plays, and six novels under the name of Mary Westmacott.

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