Psychoanalytic Therapy: Principles and Application, Volume 1946

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U of Nebraska Press, 1980 - Psychology - 353 pages
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First published in 1946, Psychoanalytic Therapy stands as a classic presentation of "brief therapy". The volume, which is based upon nearly six hundred cases, derives from a concerted effort at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis to define the principles that make possible a psychotherapy shorter and more efficient than traditional psychoanalysis and to develop specific techniques of treatment. While taking a psychoanalytic approach, the authors urge the therapist to plan carefully and sensibly to avoid letting every case drift into "interminable" psychoanalysis. They address not only psychiatrists and psychoanalysts, but also psychologists, general physicians, social workers, and "all whose work is closely concerned with human relationships."
 

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Contents

THE DEVELOPMENT OF PSYCHOANALYTIC THERAPY
13
THE PRINCIPLE OF FLEXIBILITY
25
THE PRINCIPLE OF CORRECTIVE EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE
66
CHAPTER PAGE
96
PLANNING PSYCHOTHERAPY
107
THE DYNAMICS OF THE THERAPEUTIC PROCESS
132
EFFICACY OF BRIEF CONTACT
145
EMOTIONAL REEDUCATION IN SUPPORTIVE THERAPY
165
CONTROL OF THE TRANSFERENCE RELATIONSHIP
173
ANALYSIS OF CHARACTER DISTURBANCE
207
ALLEVIATION OF RIGID STANDARDS
233
CHAPTER PACK
268
VARIATIONS IN GOAL AND TECHNIQUE
291
THE USE OF NARCOSYNTHESIS IN WAR NEUROSIS
325
CONCLUSIONS AND OUTLOOK
338
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About the author (1980)

Franz Alexander was director of the Department of Psychiatry at Mt. Sinai Hospital, Los Angeles, and professor of psychiatry at the University of Southern California. Himself a pioneer in psychoanalysis, his works include "The Western Mind in Transition; The Scope of Psychoanalysis, 1921-1961; Fundamentals of Psychoanalysis; Psychosomatic Medicine; "and "The History of Psychiatry.

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