Psychological Modeling: Conflicting Theories

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AldineˇAtherton, 1971 - Learning, Psychology of - 210 pages

The phenomenon of learning has always been of fundamental interest to psychologists. Although much of the research in this area approaches the process of learning as a consequence of direct experience, this volume is principally concerned with learning by example.

A widening interest in modeling and vicarious processes of learning has been apparent in recent years. Psychological Modeling highlights the most important work done in the subject and offers an extensive review of the major theories of learning by modeling. In his introductory essay, the editor identifies the most important controversial issues in the field of observational learning and reviews a large body of research findings.

Among the questions debated in this volume are: How do observers form an internal model of the outside world to guide their actions? What role does reinforcement play in observational learning? What is the relative effectiveness of models presented in live action, in pictorial presentations, or through verbal description? What is the scope of modeling influences? What factors determine whether people will learn what they have observed? What types of people are most susceptible to modeling influences, and what types of models are most influential in modifying the behavior of others?

This volume deals with an important problem area in a lively fashion. Its special organization makes it a stimulating adjunct to all courses in psychology - undergraduate and graduate - in which psychological modeling is discussed. It also provides a readable introduction for educators and other professionals seeking reliable information on the state of knowledge in this area.

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Contents

Analysis of Modeling Processes
1
Mimicry in Mynas Gracula Religiosa A Test
63
A Comparative Test of the Status Envy Social Power
70
Copyright

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About the author (1971)

Albert Bandura was born on December 4, 1925, in Mundare, Alberta, Canada. He attended school at an elementary and high school in one and received his bachelor's from the University of British Columbia in 1949. Before he entered college, he spent one summer filling holes on the Alaska Highway in the Yukon. Bandura graduated from the University of Iowa in 1952 with his Ph. D., and after graduating, took a post-doctoral position with the Wichita Guidance Center in Kansas. In 1953, Bandura accepted a position teaching at Stanford University. There he collaborated with student, Richard Walters on his first book, "Adolescent Aggression" in 1959. He was President of the APA in 1973 and received the APA's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contribution in 1980. In 1999 he received the Thorndike Award for Distinguished Contributions of Psychology to Education from the American Psychological Association, and in 2001, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy. He is also the recipient of the Outstanding Lifetime Contribution to Psychology Award from the American Psychological Association and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Western Psychological Association, the James McKeen Cattell Award from the American Psychological Society, and the Gold Medal Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contribution to Psychological Science from the American Psychological Foundation. In 2008, he received the Grawemeyer Award for contributions to psychology. His works include Social Learning Theory, Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social Cognitive Theory, and Self-efficacy : the exercise of control.

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