Psychology and the Teacher

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1909 - Educational psychology - 329 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 192 - Yet this specific character of the training must not be exaggerated. It is, after all, not only the one specific kind of movement which is trained but the whole group of movements which involve similar activities. In training for baseball, we do not train for football and still less for piano playing. But by training for baseball, we secure general alertness in our motor responses.
Page 264 - Training of mental activity must be acknowledged as a function of the school certainly equivalent to the mere acquisition of knowledge and the development of inspiration. Moreover, our psychological study showed clearly to us that every mental function can really be developed. Apperception and observation, memory and imagination, attention and interest, imitation and reasoning, feeling and emotion, effort and will, in fact, every function can be rapidly strengthened through systematic training and...
Page 331 - ANCIENT GREEK LITERATURE. BY GILBERT GA MURRAY, MA, Professor of Greek in the University of Glasgow. ENGLISH LITERATURE.
Page 17 - ... methods which appeal always to the natural desires and the involuntary attention and interest do not train the pupil in overcoming desires and in controlling attention; they plead instead of commanding; they teach one to follow the path of least resistance instead of the path of duty and the ideal. The result is a flabby inefficiency, a loose vagueness and inaccuracy, an acquaintance with a hundred things and a mastery of none.
Page 335 - This book deals with the facts and principles of mental development. It takes up the special phase of psychology which is of most importance to teachers, for it traces the changes which are produced in mental life as a result of education in its various forms. It calls attention to many facts in the teacher's own mental life that illustrate...
Page 76 - ... child is dealt with. Hence the true teacher needs not only an understanding of the purposes and aims of education and an enthusiastic devotion to those ideal aims, but he needs a thorough understanding of the ways in which the mind of the child can be influenced and developed. Ethics could teach him only those purposes and ideals. If the teacher seeks insight into the means by which the aim can be reached, into the facts by which the child can be molded, his way must lead from ethics to psychology.
Page 85 - ... the scientific investigator. The question involved is put by Miinsterberg as follows: Can we feel with the child if we are in the habit of observing him as a psychological mechanism? In answer to the query he continues: We have reached a serious argument which psychological pedagogy has to face. From all sides we hear the cry that the teacher ought to know more psychology ; but are we sure that the real success of this reform may not mean a defeat of the most important instincts in the teacher?...
Page 279 - ... partial processes quickly shows to what a high degree the mental and physiological acts in reading and in writing overlap. The psychological study of both processes therefore reenforces the conviction that they ought to be developed together. Moreover, the elaborate experiments of recent years indicate that the principle of progress in both cases is essentially the same. We said that the adult person has learned to produce the speech movement for a whole word by one motor impulse while the untrained...
Page 282 - He also demonstrates to his satisfaction that "phonetic spelling removes most of the means and helps to a ready grasping of the sentence. If we had an ideal phonetic spelling, the child would have to make a much greater intellectual effort in the simplest reading. These odd and queer ways of spelling are landmarks which help the recognition and apperception of the words in every line. To simplify the spelling completely would mean to make reading very difficult. If to and two and too were written...
Page 335 - Secretary of the Ohio Teachers' Reading Circle, has to say : " I think Judd's ' Genetic Psychology ' a very profitable book for students of human nature ; therefore, excellent for teachers and for reading circles." While Miss Margaret W. Sutherland, of the Columbus Teachers' Reading Circle, states that " we have been using Judd's ' Genetic Psychology ' in the Columbus branch of the Ohio Teachers' Reading Circle and have derived much pleasure and profit from it." The Story of the Mind. A Volume in...

Bibliographic information