Psycholinguistics: A Resource Book for Students

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 231 pages
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Routledge English Language Introductions cover core areas of language study and are one-stop resources for students.
Assuming no prior knowledge, books in the series offer an accessible overview of the subject, with activities, study questions, commentaries and key readings - all in the same volume. The innovative and flexible 'two-dimensional' structure is built around four sections - introduction, development, exploration and extension - which offer self-contained stages for study. Each topic can also be read across these sections, enabling the reader to build gradually on the knowledge gained.
Psycholinguistics:

  • is a comprehensive introduction to psycholinguistic theory
  • covers the core areas of psycholinguistics: language as a human attribute, language and the brain, vocabulary storage and use, language and memory, the four skills (writing, reading, listening, speaking), comprehension, language impairment and deprivation
  • draws on a range of real texts, data and examples, including a Radio Four interview, an essay written by a deaf writer, and the transcript of a therapy session addressing stuttering
  • provides classic readings by the key names in the discipline, including Jean Aitchison, Terrence Deacon, Robert Logie, Willem Levelt and Dorothy Bishop.

Written by an experienced teacher, this accessible textbook is an essential resource for all students of English language, linguistics and psychology.

The accompanying website to this book can be found at http://www.routledge.com/textbooks/0415276004

 

 

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Contents

what is it?
2
Language speech and communication
4
Language and the brain
7
LIST OF FIGURES
8
Knowing a word
10
Lexical storage and lexical access
15
The information processing approach
17
Writing systems
21
Talking apes
94
Lateralisation in the brain
96
Subjects with no known brain damage
98
The meaning ofmeaning
101
Models of lexical retrieval
105
Memory and language
109
The Baddeley model of Working Memory
111
The stages of writing
115

Decoding in reading
25
Issues in listening
30
Characteristics of speech
33
Hesitant and fluent phases in speech
37
Long Term Memory and Schema Theory
38
Exceptional circumstances
42
Topic fl INTRODUCTION DEVELOPMENT
45
data
47
Data in Psycholinguistics
48
Animal communication
50
Localising language in the brain
53
Brocas area and Wernickes area
54
A comparison of Brocas and Wernickes aphasia
55
Lexical form
57
Word association
60
Commonest word association responses to four stimuli
61
Bottomup and topdown processing
65
Topdown processing
68
Writing at word level
70
Eye movements in reading
72
Categorical perception
75
Stages in the speaking process
78
Meaning representations
82
Language disorders
86
analysis and reflection
91
The language studied in Psycholinguistics
92
activities
116
Skilled and unskilled readers
118
Listening in real time
123
A model of speaking
128
Inference
131
a smallscale research study
134
Psycholinguistic readings
139
The goals of Psycholinguistics George A Miller
140
The evolution of speech Ib Ulbaek
145
Localisation and lateralisation revisited Terrence Deacon
151
Forming lexical categories Jean Aitchison
156
Lexical processing Kenneth I Forster
161
an overview Robert H Logie
167
Factors in skilled writing Carl Bereiter and Marlene Scardamalia
173
Decoding versus whole word Philip Gough and Sebastian Wren
179
Locating word boundaries Anne Cutler and Sally Butterfield
185
Selfmonitoring in speaking Willem Levelt
190
128
193
Anaphor resolution Nicola Yuill and Jane Oakhill
195
131
205
Material for activities
208
Further reading
212
References
217
Glossary
227
Copyright

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Page 223 - Press, in press. Light LL, & Capps, JL (1986). Comprehension of pronouns in young and older adults.

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About the author (2003)

John Field lectures and writes on psychological processes in language. He currently teaches at Kings College, London, UK.

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