Psychosocial Occupational Therapy: A Holistic Approach

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Singular Publishing Group, 1998 - Occupational therapy - 603 pages
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"This text defines occupational therapy as an applied science and rehabilitation profession concerned with enabling individuals with disabilities to reach their maximum potential in performing daily functions." "The authors, both experts in the field, bring together a holistic approach by using historical references, current occupational therapy practice, and research evidence. They discuss and evaluate clearly the traditional and alternative treatment techniques and emphasize occupational therapy's link to its historical roots, as well as the emerging trends in community mental health."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Contents

A Short History of the Treatment of Individuals with Mental Illness and
25
4 Theoretical Models Underlying the Clinical Practice of Psychosocial
99
The Basis for Achieving
173
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About the author (1998)

Franklin Stein is Professor Emeritus of Occupational Therapy at the University of South Dakota and founding editor of Occupational Therapy International. Prior to coming to the University of South Dakota he was the Director of the School of Medical Rehabilitation at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, Director of the Occupational Therapy Program at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee and Associate Professor, Graduate Division at Sargent College, Boston University. He is the co-author of several textbooks and has written over 50 articles in journals and books related to rehabilitation and psychosocial research. He has presented more than a hundred seminars, workshops, institutes, short courses and research papers at national and international conferences.

Susan K. Cutler, Ph.D., NCSP, ABSNP, received a Ph.D. in special education with a minor in neuropsychology from the University of New Mexico in 1993. Although she has recently retired from teaching at the university level, she will continue to work in private practice as a school psychologist. At present, she assesses students in an Ojibwe tribal school and at charter schools in Northern Minnesota. She holds national certification in school psychology and is pursuing further training in the field of school neuropsychology. Dr. Cutler is a national and international conference speaker in the field of special education, and assessment. Her focus is on helping parents and teachers use formal and informal assessment to develop appropriate educational programs and interventions for students who struggle in school. She has co-authored three books with Frank Stein.

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