Public Speaking in the Reshaping of Great Britain

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University of Delaware Press, 1987 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 246 pages
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This volume and its predecessor work, The Influence of Rhetoric in the Shaping of Great Britain, constitute the first comprehensive history of public speaking in the British Isles, including full consideration of preaching and religious changes, the growth and influence of parliament, social and labor problems, intellectual controversies, the rights of Ireland and Scotland, and the struggle to attain equality for women.
 

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Contents

A CHALLENGE TO RHETORIC CONFRONTING THE IDEA OF DEMOCRACY
26
THE OLD VERSUS THE NEW DEVISING FORMS FOR DEMOCRACY
38
THE FOCUS OF ARGUMENT WHAT DIRECTION SHOULD GOVERNMENT TAKE?
57
UNCERTAIN RHETORIC WHAT TO DO ABOUT IRELAND AND THE COLONIES?
74
CHALLENGE TO THE CHURCH REINTERPRETATIONS OF FAITH
94
THE CENTRAL TRIAD VICTORIA DISRAELI AND GLADSTONE
116
AFTER THE WATERSHED DREAMING ABOUT DEMOCRACY
135
TORCHBEARERS OF A NEW REVOLUTION PEACEFUL BUT RADICAL CHANGE
152
SPEAKING UP FOR WOMEN BRIDGING THE GENDER GAP
174
BRITAINS SOLEMN HOUR THE ROLE OF CHURCHILLS ORATORY
191
THE ROLE OF RHETORIC IN RESHAPING HISTORY CHANGING AND EXPANDING
207
NOTES
219
SELECTED READINGS
232
INDEX
242
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Page 19 - Tis not too late to seek a newer world," for my purpose holds To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths Of all the western stars, until I die. . . . Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek,
Page 20 - of despair: Out of the night that covers me, Black as the Pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. The rhetoric
Page 18 - We thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever gods may be That no life lives forever; That dead men rise up never; That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea. The
Page 29 - He who lets the world, or his own portion of it, choose his plan of life for him, has no need of any other faculty than the ape-like one of imitation.

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