Oxford Historical Society, Volume 4

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Clarendon Press for the Oxford Historical Society, 1885 - Oxford (England) - 415 pages
 

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Page 113 - Warden, by the motion of his lady, did put the College to unnecessary charges, and very frivolous expences ; among which were a very large looking glass, for her to see her ugly face, and body to the middle, and perhaps lower, which was bought in Hilary Terme, 1674, and cost, as the Bursar told me?
Page 35 - ... without, men of humble birth, and dependent on charity for bare subsistence, but with a noble self-confidence transcending that of Bacon or of Newton, thought out and copied out those subtle masterpieces of mediaeval lore, purporting to unveil the hidden laws of Nature as well as the dark counsels of Providence and the secrets of human destiny, which — frivolous and baseless as they may appear under the scrutiny of a later criticism — must still be ranked among the grandest achievements of...
Page 22 - The northern estates were let as early as 1280, and the college never farmed on its own account its lands in Leicestershire. After the plague most of the lands were let. The wages of labour, despite the restrictions put on them by the statute of 1350, rose so considerably that it was no longer profitable to hold and cultivate by bailiff. Corn, it is true, was dear, for between the years 1349 and 1376 the average price of wheat was only three times below 5*.
Page 52 - Hall round the fire on Holyday evenings and their Vigils, enduring from the Vigil of All Saints to the evening of the Purification : which custom being before annulled in Dr. Gervase his time, the Psalms of Sternhold and Hopkins were appointed in their places.
Page 15 - Bursars' rolls of 1306, noting payments for ' the new chambers,' may perhaps mark the actual time of their completion. The southern and western sides of this quadrangle — the cradle of the college system — may have been erected in the next generation. The library which forms the upper part of these wings has always been regarded as the work of William Rede, Bishop of Chichester, who died in 1376, leaving to the college a chest with 1oo/.
Page 88 - Room," and the drawing-room adjoining. The King was constantly there, probably finding Merton a pleasant retreat from the bustle of Christ Church, and doubtless many interesting reunions took place there of which history is silent. It is particularly remarked by Anthony Wood that, during the Queen's stay in Merton there were divers marriages, christenings, and burials in the Chapel, of which all record [has been lost, as the private Register in which the chaplain had noted them was stolen out of...
Page 46 - Physic, and being so elected, had power put into his hands of punishing all misdemeanours done in the time of Christmas, either by imposing exercises on the juniors, or putting into the stocks at the end of the Hall any of the servants, with other punishments that were sometimes very ridiculous. He...
Page 86 - Ibs. were sent in by six country gentlemen, one of whom, Sir Peter Wick, contributed as much as 360 Ibs. The mint was at New Inn Hall, which alone contributed no plate. It appears from the Archives of All Souls that these gifts of plate were treated as loans, to be repaid at a fixed rate per oz., but it is, perhaps, needless to say that no such repayment ever took effect1. On June 14, 1643, another levy of 2,000 was made upon the University and City respectively. The University raised its quota...
Page 38 - ... should be excluded from either giving or receiving instruction in the college. Happily this injunction was neglected, medical science continued to be cultivated at Merton as a part of ' philosophy ; ' and John Chamber, elected warden in 1525, was a doctor of medicine, physician to Henry the Eighth, and associated with Linacre in the foundation of the College of Physicians. Anthony Wood informs us that when Tunstal. Linacre's executor, assigned to Merton College the endowments left by him for...
Page 117 - Why doth solid and serious learning decline, and few or none follow it now in the University? Answer, because of coffeahouses, where they spend all their time...

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