Oxford Historical Society, Volume 4

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Clarendon Press for the Oxford Historical Society, 1885 - Oxford (England) - 415 pages
 

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Page 140 - The King to Oxford sent a troop of horse, For Tories own no argument but force ; With equal skill to Cambridge books he sent, For Whigs admit no force but argument.
Page 113 - College to unnecessary charges, and very frivolous expences ; among which were a very large looking glass, for her to see her ugly face, and body to the middle, and perhaps lower, which was bought in Hilary Terme, 1674, and cost, as the Bursar told me?
Page 292 - Puritan discipline under which the. University was then governed. Being already MA, he was created MB in 1657, by virtue of letters from Richard Cromwell, then Chancellor. Hearne mentions him as the author of two poems ; one called ' Urania, or a Description of the painting of the top of the Theatre at Oxon ' ( 1 669), and the other ' The English Rechabite, or a Defyance to Bacchus and all his Works.
Page 11 - University a great seminary of secular clergy, which should educate a succession of men capable of doing good service in Church and State. The conception which underlies and pervades his Statutes is well interpreted by Bishop Hobhouse : — ' He borrowed from the monastic institutions the idea of an aggregate body living by common rule, under a common head, provided with all things needful for a corporate and perpetual life, fed by its secured endowments, and fenced from all external interference...
Page 90 - It is here stated that by the Divine goodness the Civil War had at last been stayed, and the Warden (Brent), with most of the Fellows, had returned, but that as there were no Bachelors, hardly any Scholars, and few Masters, it was decided to elect but one Bursar and one Dean. It is added that as the hall still lay ' situ et ruinis squalida,' the college meeting was held in the Warden's lodgings. At the same meeting two Fellows of Merton — Fowle and Lovejoy — were suspended for having borne arms...
Page 22 - The northern estates were let as early as 1280, and the college never farmed on its own account its lands in Leicestershire. After the plague most of the lands were let. The wages of labour, despite the restrictions put on them by the statute of 1350, rose so considerably that it was no longer profitable to hold and cultivate by bailiff. Corn, it is true, was dear, for between the years 1349 and 1376 the average price of wheat was only three times below 5*.
Page 35 - ... without, men of humble birth, and dependent on charity for bare subsistence, but with a noble self-confidence transcending that of Bacon or of Newton, thought out and copied out those subtle masterpieces of mediaeval lore, purporting to unveil the hidden laws of Nature as well as the dark counsels of Providence and the secrets of human destiny, which — frivolous and baseless as they may appear under the scrutiny of a later criticism — must still be ranked among the grandest achievements of...
Page 46 - Physic, and being so elected, had power put into his hands of punishing all misdemeanours done in the time of Christmas, either by imposing exercises on the juniors, or putting into the stocks at the end of the Hall any of the servants, with other punishments that were sometimes very ridiculous. He...
Page 318 - Scholars and brethren, and so of any other manors which I have acquired or may acquire for their use, under the forms and conditions set down below, and that, as well in respect to the persons as to the rules which are to bind them, and which must, God willing, be observed without intermission during all times to come. CHAPTER 2. Of the Law Students and Scholars who are to reside in the House, The form, therefore, which I enact and decree to be for ever observed, is, that in the House which bears...
Page 66 - A provision in the Statute regulating college leases was gradually increasing the wealth of colleges, and encouraging a system of money allowances to Fellows and Scholars which by no means conduced to frugal living. We may distrust the statement of Casaubon that in 1613 the colleges maintained above 2000 students, ' generally of respectable parentage, and some even of the first nobility ; ' but he probably spoke from personal experience when he added that ' the Heads of Houses lived handsomely, even...

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