Publications of the Buffalo Historical Society, Volume 3

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Page 6 - If we had any disputes about hunting grounds, they were generally settled without the shedding of much blood: but an evil day came upon us; your forefathers crossed the great waters and landed on this island. Their numbers were small; they found friends, not enemies; they told us they had fled from their own country for fear of wicked men, and come here to enjoy their religion. They asked for a small seat; we took pity on them, granted their request, and they sat down among us; we gave them corn...
Page 6 - But an evil day came upon us. Your forefathers crossed the great water, and landed on this island. Their numbers were small. They found friends and not enemies. They told us they had fled from their own country, for fear of wicked men, and had come here to enjoy their religion.
Page 51 - But ah! what once has been shall be no more! The groaning earth in travail and in pain Brings forth its races, but does not restore, And the dead nations never rise again.
Page 29 - A pillar of state ; deep on his front engraven Deliberation sat, and public care ; And princely counsel in his face yet shone, Majestic, though in ruin : sage he stood With Atlantean shoulders fit to bear The weight of mightiest monarchies ; his look Drew audience and attention still as night Or summer's noontide air...
Page 23 - The cleared land has become a thicket Woe! Woe! The clear places are deserted. Woe!
Page 102 - I have paid to Indians ; and induced me to believe, that before they became acquainted with white people and were infected with their vices, they must have been as happy a people as any in the world. In returning to our quarters we passed by the Indian council, where Red Jacket was displaying his oratory to his brother chiefs, on the subject of Colonel Pickering's proposals.
Page 71 - ... the ceremony, took away the former name of the incipient chief and assigned him a new 'one, perhaps, like Napoleon's titles, commemorative of the event which led to its bestowment. Thus, when the celebrated RED-JACKET was elevated by election to the dignity of chief, his original name, O-TE-TI-AN-I (Always Ready...
Page 71 - I h - ceremony, took away the former name of the incipient chief and assigned him a new one, perhaps, like Napoleon's titles, commemorative of the event which led to its bestowment. Thus, when the celebrated Red-Jacket was elevated by election to the dignity of a chief, his original name, O-te-ti-an-i (Always Ready...
Page 34 - ... of our nation who have become your children, and have determined to die so, may know what to do. In this case, one chief has said he would ask you to put him out of pain.
Page 34 - FATHER : You have said that we are in your hand, and that by closing it you could crush us to nothing. Are you determined to crush us ? If you are, tell us so; that those of our nation who have become your children, and have determined to die so, may know what to do.

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